Evans Data’s Developer Insights for Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Projects

With the amount of data being collected by businesses and the rise in compute power on desktops, servers, private/public/hybrid cloud systems, mobile devices, and edge connectors, every developer is looking to leverage new AI, machine learning, deep learning and big data technologies. At just about every developer conference and webinar there are presentations and demonstrations of how to use modern techniques to gain business insights and perform analysis and actions close to the customer interaction, edge connection and all along the computing infrastructure. New developer technologies are helping accelerate the digital transformations globally in every industry segment.

Last week I hosted a track on the use of “IoT in Enterprise” at the IoT Tech Expo North America conference in Silicon Valley. Along with the IoT tracks there were two co-located events covering Blockchain and AI. While I roamed the exhibit hall during breaks in my track sessions, you could see and feel the energy surrounding the coming together of IoT devices, data collection, analytics, and AI technologies for business benefits. Developers and decision makers were having wonderful conversations in the aisles and hallways. In my conversations with speakers and attendees it was clear that we are witnessing an acceleration in the developer and business use of machine learning.

Developers Leaving Rules Based Engines for Machine Learning in AI Projects

Yesterday’s Evans Data press release, “Developers Leaving Rules Based Engines for Machine Learning in AI Projects“, (SANTA CRUZ, CA. Dec 5, 2017), reports that just over 50% of developers engaged in artificial intelligence projects now solely implement machine learning technology in those projects, according Evans Data’s recently released Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Survey. Those using rules based engines alone accounted for 27% of the AI developers while just a little more than 22% are using a hybrid system that combines both machine learning techniques with rules-based technologies.

The rules-based system is one of the simplest types of AI. Also known as an expert system, a rule-based system encodes expert knowledge, usually in a fairly narrow area, into an automated system that can perform tasks or deliver answers in a manner similar to a human. Machine learning, on the other hand, enables the system to create rules on the fly through training which results in a model that is used to classify data. While the rules-based systems have been used longer, machine learning has been increasingly embraced by AI developers.

“There’s plenty of excellent applications for rules-based engines and they have been used for years,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp, “but today we’re seeing developers eagerly adopting machine learning algorithms into their projects and training them so they can evolve and function on their own. Major vendors and organizations in the industry are helping to spur this development by providing frameworks and tools to facilitate machine learning development.”

Related data showed that concept clustering, artificial neural networks, and reinforcement learning were techniques that were most likely to be used in AI projects. Speech recognition is also becoming a popular way of interacting with AI systems with 45% of AI developers incorporating this technology into their projects.

The new Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Survey is conducted twice a year with developers actively working in those disciplines and has a margin of error of 4.8%. The full 150 page report includes sections on Demographics, Industry Landscape, AI Concepts and Methods, Barriers and Challenges for AI, Enterprise AI, I and Cloud, IoT and Machine Learning, Parallel Processing, Hardware and Infrastructure Needs, Conversational Systems, Security Needs, and more.

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

 

DevRelate Blog Posts Related to AI, Machine Learning and Big Data

Here are a few additional DevRelate blog posts that cover AI, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, tools, frameworks and more. In looking at many developer programs, I see new additions to embrace AI and Big Data technologies in a range of communities and businesses.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99

My IoT in Enterprise track at IoT Tech Expo North America

This week I am the Track Chair for the “IoT in Enterprise” track (Thursday, November 30, 2017) at the IoT Tech Expo Conference North America at the Santa Clara Convention Center. Quoting from the track description in the conference program: “The Industrial Internet of Things or Industry 4.0 heralds an era of unlimited potential to change across the enterprise landscape. Will this become the age of ultimate industrial automation? What efficiencies and new opportunities can be realised as a result? How can the complexities be understood and challenges overcome? In this session we take a close look at some of the main sectors of enterprise who are embracing IoT within their workflows, from tracking of freight and fleets using asset management with case studies from the worlds leading Logistics companies to discussing how IoT can impact Agriculture. How Oil, Gas and Energy companies are getting involved in the IoT is also being highlights right from oil fields through to facilities management in the latest smart buildings. This track is suited to attendees who wish to hear from high-level speakers about how the world’s biggest and most forward thinking enterprises are utilising IoT within their businesses.”

To open up the day I will welcome everyone to the conference and the track and give some opening remarks that will include excerpts from Evans Data IoT Vertical Research Service.

I will also moderate two panels during the day as well as introducing the presenters and their sessions.

 

Topics Covered in the IoT in Enterprise Track

  • Using Hololens to drive process optimization for Enterprise – Patrick Bass, CEO, thyssenkrupp North America
  • Accelerating IoT Adoption – Mighael Botha, CTO, Software AG
  • Case Study, Connected Car – Dr. Lakshmi Thanayankizil Ph.D., Wireless Connectivity Specialist , General Motors
  • Optimizing energy usage in Enterprise using IoT technology – Greg Wolfson, Solutions Development Lead – Connected Energy, Shell New Energies
  • Start-Up as a Service: Transforming IoT Innovation in Enterprise – Mark Modzelewski, GM, Treeline
  • Innovative Safety Solution: What happens when you combine existing technology to create a comprehensive safety planning solution? – Ashly Coggins, Construction Manager, FLUOR

Panel Discussions during the IoT in Enterprise Track

  • Keynote Panel: IoT Technologies in Enterprise
  • Panel: Smart logistics for freight and fleet management
  • Panel: Smart buildings and lighting

 

A Collection of Evans Data IoT Related Press Releases

 

David I - Developer Relations Conference

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

 

DevRel Best Practices Part 2 – Webinar Information and Links

During the DevRelate November webinar we’ll be covering Part 2 of our series focused on Developer Marketing and Developer Relations Best Practices. In this blog post you’ll find additional information and links for topics covered in the webinar. Bookmark this page and come back during November for additional updates.

Webinar Agenda

  1. Reasons for Joining and Staying in a Developer Program
  2. Developer Relations Best Practices Part 2
  3. Q&A

 

Best Practices Areas Covered in Part 2

  • Events & Activities
  • API Sandboxes, Virtual Labs, Cloud Instances
  • App Stores & Application showcases
  • Community Chat Systems
  • Training & Certification
  • Popular Blogging Topics
  • Programming Languages to Support

 

Popularity of Programming Languages

  • Tiobe Index – Updated once a month, the Tiobe Index is calculated by using multiple search engines looking for the number of skilled engineers, courses and third party vendors. You can read more about how the Tiobe Index is computed on their website.
  • Redmonk Programming Language Rankings – The Redmonk ranking appears bi-annually and appears on Stephen O’Grady’s blog. The latest version, “The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2017” appeared on his blog on March 17, 2017. The ranking is based on code on GitHub and discussions on Stack Overflow. The ranking correlates programming language discussions and usage on these two popular sites.
  • PYPL: PopularitY of Programming Language Index – This index is created by analyzing how often programming language tutorials are searched using Google. The index page says “If you believe in collective wisdom, the PYPL Popularity of Programming Language index can help you decide which language to study, or which one to use in a new software project.”
  • Indeed Job Trends – Using the Indeed search system you can get some trending results for Job Postings and Job Seeker Interest. Using the interface, you can string together a query based on adding a series of programming languages.
  • Programming Languages used in Elementary and High Schools – In the US the College Board’s AP Computer Science exam uses the Java programming language. Previously programming languages including C++, Modula-2 and Pascal were used. You can also find other programming languages used in secondary education to prepare students for college and work force placement. The languages used in elementary and high schools can often depend on the skills of the teachers and will normally include the use of  Python, Scratch, JavaScript, Alice and others. The ACM Model Curriculum for K-12 Computer Science gives guidance for schools but does not push a specific programming language.
  • Programming Languages Taught in College Computer Science – Different college computer science departments choose programming languages that are used as the first course and some focus on a language in the core computer science classes. Stanford University used to teach Java but recent news articles report that Stanford has moved from Java to JavaScript for their introduction to programming course. While C++, Java, JavaScript and other programming languages are taught in schools, most universities also cover a wide range of programming languages, algorithms, data structures and technologies to help prepare graduates for their move into industry, research and teaching.

 

OPENAPI and Swagger

With the Swagger YAML and/or JSON files you can use Swagger’s CodeGen tool to create bindings for more than 20 server side languages and more than 40 client side languages.

 

Evans Data Tactical Marketing Reports

Evans Data reaches out to its global developer panel to produce two annual tactical marketing reports: Developer Marketing Survey Report and Developer Relations Survey Report. The Developer Marketing Survey contains software developers’ attitudes about marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaigns. The Developer Relations Survey examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program and advocacy.

 

A Developer by any other Name

We often get asked how many developers there are working in the world. This sounds like a simple question and at the same time the term “developer” does not fully convey the spectrum of how a developer self describes who they are and what they do.  If I refined a developer more specificly as a “professional developer” would that create a clearer definition as someone who gets paid for programming? Is having the professional developer moniker mean that they have a related job title, use a specific number of programming languages, spend a specific amount of time developing, know a wide range of development tools, platforms, frameworks, libraries and architectures? Depending on who you talk with, there are many additional titles and terms we use to talk about who and what a developer is.

How Developers Self Identify?

There are many ways to talk about who writes programs for a living and for fun. When Evans Data (EDC) works with our clients, we are often helping them to understand how many professional developers there are in the world and how this number is growing. The research results are published in the EDC Global Developer Population and Demographic Study and also appear in EDC press releases, infographics and presentations:

 

EDC research shows that there are approximately 22 million professional developers in the world today. At this year’s Apple World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC 2017) Tim Cook announced that Apple has 16 million registered developers for their devices and platforms (up 3 million from the previous year).

 

What Developer Titles do you Track?

In a developer relations program, depending on your product, service, device, platform, framework or other offerings, you’ll reach out to a range of different types of developers. You will need to communicate and create content that speaks to the various different developers and expertise levels. Here are a few (of the many) ways to name someone that builds software for a company, for their customers and for themselves:

  • Professional Developer
  • Application Developer
  • Systems Developer
  • Full Stack Developer
  • Modern Developer
  • Programmer
  • Software Engineer
  • Hacker
  • Maker
  • Coder
  • Hobbyist
  • Situational Developer
  • Occupational Developer
  • Citizen Developer

 

What types of Developers does your Developer Relations Program speak To?

if your developer outreach program identifies additional developer personas, send me an email with the job titles that you reach out to.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://devnet.evansdata.org/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99

DevRelate Webinar Nov 16 & 28 : Developer Relations Best Practices (Part 2)

Back in January 2017 we presented the first in a series of Developer Relations Best Practices, “Developer Relations Best Practices and Tools of the Trade“, focused on several aspects you’ll find in a well run developer outreach program. In that webinar we covered seven developer program best practices including: Social Media, Blogs, Newsletters, Webinars, Videos, Documentation and Answers.

In Part 2 of the Developer Relations Best Practices webinar series we’ll cover: events & activities, API sandboxes & virtual labs, app stores & application showcases, community chat systems, training & certification, popular blogging topics, and the programming languages you should support.

The developer relations best practices webinar content is supported by Evans Data Tactical Developer Marketing (Developer Marketing 2017 Survey and Developer Relations 2017 Survey) research results.

Agenda

1) Reasons for Joining and Staying in a Developer Program
2) Developer Relations Best Practices Part 2
3) Q&A

Dates and Times

This webinar is offered multiple times on Tuesday, November 16th and Tuesday, November 28th. Select the date and time that works best for you. Use the pull down date/time box on the GoToWebinar registration page to select the session you want to attend. Register here!

Thursday (November 16, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 1pm Pacific Standard Time (3pm CST, 4pm EST, 9PM GMT, 10pm CET)
  • 5pm Pacific Standard Time (9am CST Beijing November 17, 12noon AEDT Sydney November 17)

Tuesday (November 28, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 10am Pacific Standard Time (12pm CST, 1pm EST, 6pm GMT, 7pm CET)

 

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Evangelists
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

The insights provided in this webinar stem from years of experience and the direct input from a global panel of software developers about what works for them and what doesn’t.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or enhancing a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get! Register Now!