DevRelate Webinar: August 14 & 16 – How to Engage the Elusive Developer

Many developer relations teams can easily find a small group of developers that fit with their target personas and product/industry segments. It’s more of a challenge to find a wider range of developers who will also build value on top of your product or service. This webinar will cover how to find the largest developer community for a new product or service offering, or how to go beyond your existing community to find new developers to expand your reach.

Agenda:

  1. Where to look for developers
  2. Matching your product/service with specific types of developers
  3. Creating the right incentives for a win/win relationship
  4. Growing your developer community as your product or service grows
  5. Q&A

 

Presenter:

  • David Intersimone, known to many as David I, is a passionate and innovative software industry veteran who extols and educates the world on developer tools, software development and software architectures. David I also shares his visions and insights as a pioneer in developer relations with program managers and directors giving workshops, webinars, guidance and advice on program creation and enhancement.

 

Dates / Times:

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

  • 7am PDT (10am EDT)
  • 1pm PDT (4pm EDT)
  • 5pm PDT (8pm EDT)

 

Thursday, August 16, 2018

  • 7am PDT (10am EDT)
  • 10am PDT (1pm EDT)

 

Note: Since this webinar takes place on several days and at multiple times, please register for the date and time that works best for you:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6991424298093761794

 

Who Should Attend?

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Advocates
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

 

Register Now

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Note: Since this webinar takes place on several days and at multiple times, please register for the date and time that works best for you.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6991424298093761794

Developer Outreach and Marketing

On first look, software developers appear to be a more distinct and well-defined market segment than most others, which should make it easier to market to them. It’s always simpler to create messaging and positioning for a target market that is uniform and cohesive than it is for a very diverse market. And so developers give the appearance of being easy to market to.

After all, there are important primary characteristics that set developers apart from the general population. They write programs professionally, and as a result a very particular type of mental acuity and skill set is more likely to be found among this group than the general population. The very act of programming requires certain characteristics. The successful developer is logical, has a keen eye for detail, and responds to mental challenges with a kind of inquisitiveness that can be associated with analytical and creative mindsets. Developers are usually more cerebral, curious and way more literal than others.

However, while there is a measure of homogeneity amongst developers that can aid marketing professionals who are trying to reach and persuade them, there is also a level of divergence from the general population that makes developer focused marketing unique. Developers frequent and place confidence in different media than the general public; they appreciate different forms of touch, and different elements in messages are more likely to resonate with them. In addition, there is not just one form of development and the types of development this group of people engage in can be so diverse that reaching out to them requires a special understanding of what they do, in addition to an understanding of who they are and what media they trust.

You can do research to find out the specifics of today’s developer and we do. We can tell you lots of data that can aid in your development of a marketing campaign and strategy. For example, developers answer to a variety of titles in their jobs, the most common being programmer, development manager, or project lead, though titles vary considerably by company size. They are overwhelmingly male. Although the female contingent is growing, males still comprise at least three out of every four developers – the ratio varies according to geography, but both mean and women developers think there should be more women involved.

Their median age is 36 in most places in the world. They tend to be married, and to have one or two children. The typical developer has between three and 10 years of experience, and has a high-level academic degree — a bachelor’s degree or higher — though there many developers who continue to learn on the job in order to keep up with the ever changing technology.

These are valuable fundamentals on which to build a strategy, but you still need the insights that only experience in marketing to developers can bring.

Providing that insight and understanding for marketing success is what motivates us at Evans Data to host our annual Developer Marketing Summit. This year it’s on September 17 and 18 in San Jose. We’ve got two full days filled with insights, networking and knowledge headed by the top developer marketing professionals from virtually all of the major players in the industry. Intel, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook, Salesforce, and many more will provide powerful insights into how to successfully reach and motivate software developers. Don’t miss this very important event. https://devmarketing.evansdata.com/

Legacy Systems and Poor Quality of Tools are Top Barriers to AI Adoption

Having to transition from existing legacy systems is the top barrier to incorporation of artificial intelligence or machine learning into organizations today, cited by 18% of developers actively working with AI or ML in Evans Data’s recently released AI, ML and Big Data Development Survey. However, the quality of existing tools was cited by almost the same number (17.4%). Other factors, such as budget or the cost of materials, regulatory or governance issues, and corporate policy restrictions were also cited by nearly as many AI developers as the top two barriers.

The June 2018 survey of active AI developers also showed that model selection is a particularly challenging aspect of AI or ML implementation along with optimizing for specific parameters and increasing algorithm accuracy. Data ingestion is the phase of AI-related development that proves most vexing to fully a third of AI developers while algorithm development is the top problem area for nearly a quarter.

“Legacy systems that are already in place and the current state of specialized tools are fairly expected issues to come up as software technology evolves to embrace artificial intelligence and machine learning,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp, “But what we also saw here was a close list of problems cited in addition to those two, and that close range is illustrative of a new but quickly maturing market.”

Additional insights from the worldwide survey of AI practitioners focus on AI in the large enterprise, hardware, parallelism, algorithms, and other focal areas crafted into data research on questions contributed by some of the largest software companies in the world.

The new Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Survey provides over 130 pages of data, analysis and graphs with an industry standard margin of error of 5%. Topics covered include: Demographics and Firmographics, Perspectives on AI, Enterprise AI, Parallelism, AI Concepts and Approaches, Tools and Processes, Security Concerns, Conversational Systems, Blockchain, Infrastructure Optimization, and more.

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

Developer Population Growth Shifts Toward China, India and Emerging Countries

Evans Data Press Release, SANTA CRUZ CA June 13th

As the population of software developers worldwide continues to grow, the hot spots top growth rate are changing. While the United States currently has the largest population of developers, India will overtake the US by 2023 according to Evans Data’s recently released Global Developer Population and Demographics Study. The top nation for growth however is China, where the growth rate of the developer population is forecast to range between 6% and 8% each year leading up to 2023.

The Global Developer Population and Demographic Study, now in its 25th edition, is the definitive developer population estimate, updated every six months. The result of extensive secondary research, the study finds 23 million developers worldwide in 2018 with projections to reach 27.7 million within five years. Global survey data laid atop the population estimates show technology adoption figures worldwide as well as by region. and offer insights into estimates on numbers of developers such as how many developers in each region are developing in the Cloud, how many use Block chain, etc.

“The US can be viewed as the cradle of software development and has thus has always had the largest developer population,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp, “However, emerging countries are definitely catching up. This is true overall and also in the adoption of various leading edge technologies, where we see a very strong uptake in China, India and also Brazil.”

Population trends and estimates cover many different types of development in the most recent study. Additional points discovered in this edition include: 7.2 million developers currently developing in the Cloud with the number of developers in the APAC region doing this almost double the number in North America.

The new Global Development Population and Demographics Study provides developer population estimates by region and for major countries within regions as well as worldwide estimates and growth projections. Demographic estimates include age, gender, years experience, education and more. Technology adoption estimates include Host and Target Platform Adoption and Migration, Cloud, BlockChain, Tool use, Tech adoption, High Performance Computing, and other topics.

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

So what does that mean for developer relations? According to the Evans Data Developer Relations Programs Survey, the number of developers who are in a formal developer relations program reached 83% – that’s over 19 million developers involved with developer programs! That showcases now more than ever, its vital to ensure you understand the needs of the developers you are targeting, perfect your outreach methods, and have the program elements in place required to attract and retain them.

For more insight on developer relations programs, check out this annual study with over 156 pages of insight – Developer Relations Program 2018