Developer Relations “Fireside Chat” with Guy Kawasaki and David I. – Tuesday March 27, 2018

At the upcoming 14th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference (DRC2018), Guy Kawasaki will participate in a “Fireside Chat” with David Intersimone “David I”. During the keynote, David I will ask Guy Kawasaki a series of questions covering developer relations best practice and experiences. They’ll also take questions from conference attendees. This keynote session will take place on Tuesday, March 27 at 11:15am at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California.

Guy Kawasaki was chief evangelist of Apple and David was chief evangelist for Borland/Embarcadero Technologies’ Developer Tools Group.

About Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. He is on the board of trustees of the Wikimedia Foundation, a brand ambassador for Mercedes Benz USA, and an executive fellow of the Haas School of Business (UC Berkeley). He was also the chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of the Start 2.0, The Art of Social Media, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

Guy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GuyKawasaki

Guy on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/

Guy’s Website: https://guykawasaki.com/

 

About David Intersimone “David I”

David Intersimone, known to many as David I, is a passionate and innovative software industry veteran who extols and educates the world on developer tools, software development and software architectures. David I joined Borland Software in 1985 where he practically invented Developer Relations. During David I’s forty-three years as a developer, development manager, developer community executive and chief evangelist, he has created a thriving global developer community, thousands of articles, videos and blog posts.

Before Embarcadero acquired the developer tools business from Borland Software, David spent more than 20 years with Borland in various evangelism, engineering, and development capacities, including creating the company’s developer relations program.

Today, David I shares his visions and insights as a pioneer in developer relations with program managers and directors through Evans Data’s Developer Program Advisory where he gives workshops, guidance and advice on program creation and enhancement and through the DevRelate Developer Program community website.

David I on Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidi99

David I on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

David I’s DevRelate blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/

 

Join us at the Evans Data 14th Annual Developer Relations Conference

The conference takes place on March 26 and 27, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California. There is also a Sunday, March 25 Developer Relations Bootcamp strategic workshop that provides a solid foundation on which you can build or enhance your developer program. Concentrated sessions in this one-day instructional program provide the insight and actionable information you can use to build your brand and establish strong relationships with your developer community.

During the two day conference the keynotes, sessions and workshops will cover all aspects of developer relations, ranging from the business side (program ROI, the connection between developer programs and company revenue, budgeting for/costs of developer programs, how to get an organization’s commitment of internal resources, etc.) to the marketing side (techniques for recruitment, awareness tactics, community loyalty building programs, legal/privacy and global privacy considerations, conducting a privacy audit, internationalizing a US-based developer program, etc), and much more.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or building on a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get – and this is the place to get it!

In an event unlike any other, developer relations experts from leading companies in the software, telecom and web markets will come together to discuss best practices and reveal the techniques behind their success!

You’ll find additional Developer Relations Conference information, keynote presenters, speakers and conference schedule on the DRC2018 Web Site.

 

Webinar February 27 & March 1, 2018 – Internal Evangelism and Enablement to Support your Developer Program

 

DevRelate Webinar February 27 & March 1, 2018 – Internal Evangelism and Enablement to Support your Developer Program.

Developer Relations team members spend most of their time doing external evangelism to their developer community and prospects. At the same time, it is even more important to have an active and ongoing focus on internal evangelism to keep key stakeholders and departments aware of what you are doing while eliciting their help and guidance for your efforts.

To some, it might seem like quite a task but it can be accomplished by setting up enabling internal technologies and systems to make it easy for employees beyond your developer relations team to support your efforts.

This webinar will cover multiple ways for you to keep your company up to date while garnering their continued support and provide assistance with your content generation and activities.

Dates/Times:

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

  • 7am Pacific Time, 9am Central Time, 10am Eastern Time, 3pm London, 4pm Frankfurt
  • 1pm Pacific Time, 3pm Central Time, 4pm Eastern Time
  • 5pm Pacific Time, 7pm Central Time, 8pm Eastern Time, 9am Beijing (Wed, Feb 28), 12noon Sydney (Wed, Feb 28)

Thursday, March 1, 2018

  • 7am Pacific Time, 9am Central Time, 10am Eastern Time, 3pm London, 4pm Frankfurt
  • 10am Pacific Time, 12noon Central Time, 1pm Eastern Time, 6pm London, 7pm Frankfurt

This webinar takes place on several days and at multiple times.

Please register for the date and time that works best for you:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6662625237414693123

Agenda:

  1. The value of Internal Evangelism
  2. Where External Evangelism Meets Internal Evangelism
  3. Creating Enabling Internal Technologies and Systems for Use Beyond your DevRel Team
  4. Q&A

Who Should Attend:

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Advocates
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities

Register Now

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6662625237414693123

 

14th Evans Data Developer Relations Conference – March 26-27 – Palo Alto – Keynote Speakers and Early Bird Special Pricing

We have a full schedule of keynote, session and workshop presenters! You won’t want to miss the live developer focus group, networking opportunities and chances to win special prizes. Register now to reserve your seat. Find additional details, schedule, speakers and registration pages at the conference site.

Keynote presenters include:

 

Janel Garvin
CEO/Founder
Evans Data
Guy Kawasaki
Chief Evangelist
Canva
Roger Chandler
Vice President & General Manager, Developer Programs & Initiatives
Intel
Jonas Jacobi
Head of Developer Advocacy, Worldwide
IBM
Sam Ramji
VP of Product Management
Google
Paul Cutsinger
Head of Alexa Code Labs
Amazon

 

Register Now to Reserve Your Seat!

 

10 Step Event/Webinar Process to Purchase

When you are preparing for an event, meetup, webinar or other activity and you want to build an effective outreach to developers in your community, you can follow 10 steps to create interest, start the engagement, lead your members to prepare and participate, and create a catalog of digital assets that you can use to drive their journey to purchase.

  1. Create a blog/news item on a technical topic to start your developer member’s interest and engender engagement.
  2. Create the Event/Webinar – invite developers.
  3. Create 2-3 short teaser videos (like you see for movies that have “trailer” and “teaser” clips to drive interest and social buzz) and post these to developer social media portals.
  4. Hire a subject matter expert/author to create an Independent Expert White Paper (20-60 pages depending on the complexity of the architecture and technology) with supporting information for the topic area.
  5. Encourage developers to download the available materials in advance of the event/webinar to prepare for and follow along with the presentation.
  6. Run the Event/Webinar in multiple locations / time zones. Remember that developers have different schedules and are located in different countries.
  7. Package the slides, demos, and notes for reuse by team members, partners, and other leaders in your community.
  8. Create a landing page with all of the videos, code/project samples and demos, slides, technical paper, and additional info/links
  9. Email all of the attendees/no shows and other community members with links to the landing page. Track their progress in using the materials with tracking links.
  10. Nurture all of those interested in the topic with additional information and offers based on their individual path(s) along the journey.

Creating all of these reusable assets and collecting them together into landing pages and placing them in an easy to find catalog on your developer community site will allow members to quickly follow a learning path and enter at a point in their development journey based on their interest area and technical level.

This 10 step process was covered in the recent DevRelate Webinar, “Effectively Communicating with Developers“. Additional information about this webinar is available on the webinar’s information links page and on the webinar replay page (DevRelate memberships required).

 

 

Evans Data’s Developer Insights for Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Projects

With the amount of data being collected by businesses and the rise in compute power on desktops, servers, private/public/hybrid cloud systems, mobile devices, and edge connectors, every developer is looking to leverage new AI, machine learning, deep learning and big data technologies. At just about every developer conference and webinar there are presentations and demonstrations of how to use modern techniques to gain business insights and perform analysis and actions close to the customer interaction, edge connection and all along the computing infrastructure. New developer technologies are helping accelerate the digital transformations globally in every industry segment.

Last week I hosted a track on the use of “IoT in Enterprise” at the IoT Tech Expo North America conference in Silicon Valley. Along with the IoT tracks there were two co-located events covering Blockchain and AI. While I roamed the exhibit hall during breaks in my track sessions, you could see and feel the energy surrounding the coming together of IoT devices, data collection, analytics, and AI technologies for business benefits. Developers and decision makers were having wonderful conversations in the aisles and hallways. In my conversations with speakers and attendees it was clear that we are witnessing an acceleration in the developer and business use of machine learning.

Developers Leaving Rules Based Engines for Machine Learning in AI Projects

Yesterday’s Evans Data press release, “Developers Leaving Rules Based Engines for Machine Learning in AI Projects“, (SANTA CRUZ, CA. Dec 5, 2017), reports that just over 50% of developers engaged in artificial intelligence projects now solely implement machine learning technology in those projects, according Evans Data’s recently released Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Survey. Those using rules based engines alone accounted for 27% of the AI developers while just a little more than 22% are using a hybrid system that combines both machine learning techniques with rules-based technologies.

The rules-based system is one of the simplest types of AI. Also known as an expert system, a rule-based system encodes expert knowledge, usually in a fairly narrow area, into an automated system that can perform tasks or deliver answers in a manner similar to a human. Machine learning, on the other hand, enables the system to create rules on the fly through training which results in a model that is used to classify data. While the rules-based systems have been used longer, machine learning has been increasingly embraced by AI developers.

“There’s plenty of excellent applications for rules-based engines and they have been used for years,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp, “but today we’re seeing developers eagerly adopting machine learning algorithms into their projects and training them so they can evolve and function on their own. Major vendors and organizations in the industry are helping to spur this development by providing frameworks and tools to facilitate machine learning development.”

Related data showed that concept clustering, artificial neural networks, and reinforcement learning were techniques that were most likely to be used in AI projects. Speech recognition is also becoming a popular way of interacting with AI systems with 45% of AI developers incorporating this technology into their projects.

The new Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data Survey is conducted twice a year with developers actively working in those disciplines and has a margin of error of 4.8%. The full 150 page report includes sections on Demographics, Industry Landscape, AI Concepts and Methods, Barriers and Challenges for AI, Enterprise AI, I and Cloud, IoT and Machine Learning, Parallel Processing, Hardware and Infrastructure Needs, Conversational Systems, Security Needs, and more.

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

 

DevRelate Blog Posts Related to AI, Machine Learning and Big Data

Here are a few additional DevRelate blog posts that cover AI, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, tools, frameworks and more. In looking at many developer programs, I see new additions to embrace AI and Big Data technologies in a range of communities and businesses.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99

A Developer by Any Other Name

We often get asked how many developers there are working in the world. This sounds like a simple question and at the same time the term “developer” does not fully convey the spectrum of how a developer self describes who they are and what they do.  If I refined a developer more specifically as a “professional developer” would that create a clearer definition as someone who gets paid for programming? Is having the professional developer moniker mean that they have a related job title, use a specific number of programming languages, spend a specific amount of time developing, know a wide range of development tools, platforms, frameworks, libraries and architectures? Depending on who you talk with, there are many additional titles and terms we use to talk about who and what a developer is.

How Developers Self Identify?

There are many ways to talk about who writes programs for a living and for fun. When Evans Data (EDC) works with our clients, we are often helping them to understand how many professional developers there are in the world and how this number is growing. The research results are published in the EDC Global Developer Population and Demographic Study and also appear in EDC press releases, infographics and presentations:

 

EDC research shows that there are approximately 22 million professional developers in the world today. At this year’s Apple World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC 2017) Tim Cook announced that Apple has 16 million registered developers for their devices and platforms (up 3 million from the previous year).

 

What Developer Titles do you Track?

In a developer relations program, depending on your product, service, device, platform, framework or other offerings, you’ll reach out to a range of different types of developers. You will need to communicate and create content that speaks to the various different developers and expertise levels. Here are a few (of the many) ways to name someone that builds software for a company, for their customers and for themselves:

  • Professional Developer
  • Application Developer
  • Systems Developer
  • Full Stack Developer
  • Modern Developer
  • Programmer
  • Software Engineer
  • Hacker
  • Maker
  • Coder
  • Hobbyist
  • Situational Developer
  • Occupational Developer
  • Citizen Developer

 

What types of Developers does your Developer Relations Program speak To?

if your developer outreach program identifies additional developer personas, send me an email with the job titles that you reach out to.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://devnet.evansdata.org/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99