Webinar – October 24 & 26, 2017 – The Twelve C’s of Developer Marketing and Developer Relations

Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members often know and talk about the “Four T’s” (Tools/SDKs, Technical Content, Technical Support and Training/Certification) and the “Three C’s” (Community, Code and Content). Most developers know that “code is king”. But, for most of those focused on reaching out and working with developers, there are many more aspects of a great developer program beyond the aforementioned seven letters.

In the October 2017 DevRelate webinar, we’ll cover the “Twelve C’s” that are integral parts of a well-oiled developer program and community. Going beyond the traditional “Three C’s”, you’ll also learn more about communicating, collaborating, cooperating and celebrating with your developer community members. We’re sure you have additional C’s that you use and follow in your developer program and outreach. Bring your experiences to the webinar and we will discuss them during the Q&A at end of the webinar.

Agenda

  1. The Four T’s
  2. The First Three C’s
  3. The Next Nine C’s
  4. Q&A

Dates/Times

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

  • 7am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 9am CDT (Chicago) | 10am EDT (New York) | 2pm GMT | 3pm BST (London) | 4pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 1pm PDT (Santa Cruz) | 2pm CDT (Chicago) | 3pm EDT (New York)
  • 5pm PDT (Santa Cruz) | 8am CST (Beijing Wednesday, October 25) | 11am AEDT (Sydney Wednesday, October 25)

Thursday, October 26, 2017

  • 7am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 9am CDT (Chicago) | 10am EDT (New York) | 2pm GMT | 3pm BST (London) | 4pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 10am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 12noon CDT (Chicago) | 1pm EDT (New York) | 5pm GMT | 6pm BST (London) | 7pm CEST (Frankfurt)

Register Now to Reserve your Seat: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3805218814647871746

Note: The webinar repeats on multiple days and times. Choose the date and time that fits your schedule.

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Advocates
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

Register Now!

Note: The webinar repeats on multiple days and times. Choose the date and time that fits your schedule.

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

David I Facebook Avatar

 

Augmented Reality Being Embraced by Two-Thirds of Mobile Developers

In a recent Evans Data Press Release, “Augmented Reality (AR) Being Embraced by Two-Thirds of Mobile Developers“, 44% of mobile developers are incorporating some form of AR in their apps. Another 30% of developers are evaluating or testing AR in their piloting and prototyping projects, according to a new Evans Data survey of over 600 mobile developers.

Although AR has numerous uses and adoption is steadily climbing, developers complain about awareness as being a major challenge in developing or piloting an augmented reality app. The plurality, 35.3%, cited lack of awareness of the potential of AR within the general public as a major hurdle, while an additional 25% cited that same lack of awareness within their organization. Lack of tools specific to AR was the biggest challenge for 15%, while less than 5% said that a lack of expertise was their biggest issue.

Hardware is a consideration in developing augmented reality and virtual reality apps. A little more than a third of those developers working on AR or VR said they were mainly working on output devices, while 23% are concentrating their efforts optimizing for CPUs/GPUsd/ICs, since these types of apps are typically highly compute intensive.

“There are thousands of ways that augmented reality can be used to make the world more interesting and accessible through mobile devices,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp. “But the only way to really exploit the potential of AR or VR is through a robust developer community that is asking new questions and trying new things.”

The new Mobile Developer Survey, now in its 17th year, is a survey of developers currently developing or deploying mobile apps. It provides a margin of error of 4%. The full 237 page report includes sections on Demographics, Approaches to Mobile Development, Mobile Development Lifecycle, Development Environments, Enterprise Mobile Development, Targeted Platforms, Developing for iOS, Android and Windows, IoT and Mobile, Cloud and Mobile, AI Incorporation, Alternative User Interfaces, and much more!

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

AR and your Developer Program

A DevRelate blog post from December 2016, “Does your Developer Program support Artificial, Augmented, Virtual, Mixed, Merged, Hybrid, etc. Reality (AR/VR/MR)?“, gave an overview of AR/VR/MR developer programs, news and industry sites.  There have been various forms of technology and non-technology based reality since the 1800s. The term “Virtual Reality” (VR) was coined by Jaron Lanier in 1978. Tom Caudell, a Boeing researcher,  coined the term “Augmented Reality” (AR) in 1990. In 1994 Paul Milgram and Fumio Kishino defined a mixed reality. A more inclusive description is the 1999 Reality-Virtuality [RV] Continuum by Paul Milgram and Herman W. Colquhoun Jr. I’ve had the fun of using Microsoft Kinect (and write code for), Oculus Rift, and Google Cardboard in the past. There is so much more happening today with several low cost and high end devices including Facebook Oculus and Microsoft Hololens. Does your developer relations program support different AR/VR/MR devices and APIs?

Recently developers are heard about AR additions included in current and future versions of the iOS and Android platforms. Apple’s iOS 11 includes ARKit, a framework that allows developers to add augmented reality capabilities into their apps for iPhone and iPad. Google has added ARCore for Android to allow developers to combine the virtual and physical world in their apps.

If your developer program supports mobile application development, you’ll want to make sure that you provide your developers with use cases and sample projects to allow integration of mobile AR capabilities with your services, APIs, devices, frameworks, and devices.

 

About Evans Data Corporation

Evans Data Corporation provides regularly updated IT industry market intelligence based on in-depth surveys of the global developer population. Evans’ syndicated research includes surveys focused on developers in a wide variety of subjects.

The Twelve C’s of Developer Relations (abridged version)

In everything that developer marketing, developer relations and developer advocacy team members do, it is good to remember the twelve C’s that are integral parts of a well oiled developer program and community. Here is a short hand version of my twelve C’s of Developer Relations. Later on, I’ll create a DevRelate white paper with a more in-depth coverage of each of the C’s.

The Twelve C’s (in no specific priority order except for the first 3)

  • Community – the main place where your development team, developer relations team and members will take part in your program, gain insights, solve problems, find answers and learn new tips, tricks and techniques.
  • Content – the videos, quick start guides, documentation, tutorials, white papers, blog posts and other valuable content.
  • Code – everyone will where most developers will spend a good portion of their time reading and writing programs. Developers love to write code, they also love to read it and share it with other developers.
  • Communication – developers like to talk to other developers. Developers also like to interact with the software engineers that create the tools, SDKs, APIs and content .
  • Collaboration – there are very few “lone” developers. Most developers work in teams, interact with other developers in their company, in their community and online in developer sites. Creating as many ways to foster collaboration by your team and your members is a sure sign of a vibrant and supportive community.
  • Contests – many developers like challenges. Some will enter programming contests and take part on hackathons. If you are creating online contests, make sure they run for a longer period of time that the typical weekend hackathon.
  • Champions – Look for the best of the best in your developer community. You’ll find them active in most aspects of your program and site. You can use gamification to identify top contributors and helpers. Give your champions a special
  • Conversations – make sure your developer program provides multiple ways for developers and your team to have conversations. These features can include forums/newsgroups, threaded conversations, posting comments on code,  content, bug reports, etc.
  • Cooperation – allow your partners and program members to help you by cooperating on bug triage, helping answer questions, participate in software testing, helping other developers with coding work, and more.
  • Contribution – allow your developer program members to contribute blog posts, add to your documentation wikis, input knowledge in the form of tips, tricks, techniques and lessons learned. If you have a bug reporting system (who doesn’t) allow community members to provide workarounds and source code fixes that work.
  • Certification – providing online and in person courses creates a more literate developer community. Providing an infrastructure for testing and certifying developers and the apps they build gives program members and their companies a higher status in your ecosystem. Some developer programs are also cooperating with local schools and online MOOCs to provide certificates of learning for technologies and your products, services, devices, APIs, tools, etc. The Google NanoDegree given by Udacity is one example of the modern way to train and certify developers. Most app stores also have test and certification systems for your apps.
  • Celebration – programming is fun (at least it is for me). Celebrating this unique form of creation and art should happen all the time in your developer program. Let your members vote for the apps, developers, MVPs, partners of the month and year (we see the same example in employee of the month/year in a lot of companies). Celebrate the release of a new product, a new partner integration, and a new capability. I even know a developer who told me that his company has “software and systems retirement” parties when they shut down and replace an application.

Do you have other C’s?

I’m sure you have additional C’s that you use and follow in your developer program and outreach. Here are a few additional C’s that I hear being used in presentations at the recent Evans Data Developer Marketing Summit: coolness, cognition, context, curiosity, culture, cohesiveness, completeness, capture, closed, and campaign.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Almost Half of Cloud Developers Using Immutable Architecture and Microservices

Evans Data put out a press release on August 23, 2017 that reported results of  a recent cloud development survey. The report showed that almost half of all developers working in and/or deploying to a Cloud are deploying and delivering environmental configurations as instances of immutable architecture (46%) in development testing and production, with only slightly less (42%) doing the same with microservices according to Evans Data Corp’s newly released Cloud Development Survey.

In addition to those currently delivering environmental configurations as immutable architectures an additional 37% are experimenting with this technology but haven’t put it into production yet. As for microservices, an additional 34% are evaluating and 15% expect to experiment with microservices in the next year.

“There’s an obvious affinity between microservices and immutable architecture,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data. “Containers in general as well as microservices can embrace immutability which enhances reliability and reduces the dependence on heavy weight installers and configuration management software. The developers are telling us the time for this evolution has come.”

The survey also showed that the most common types of applications that are containerized are Business to Business applications, followed by backend development, and while the vast majority of those who use containers use some kind of orchestration tools, the orchestrator that most use is the one that ships with the container software they use.

VMware, Pivotal, Google jointly announce PKS (Pivotal Container Service)

I attended VMWare’s recent VMWorld 2017 conference in Las Vegas. During the Tuesday morning keynote, Pat Gelsinger (VMware CEO), Michael Dell (Dell Technologies Chairman and CEO), Rob Mee (Pivotal CEO) and Sam Ramji (Google Cloud VP) were on stage to announce that the companies are working together to simplify the creation, deployment, orchestration and management of containers at enterprise scale.

IMG_8226  IMG_8221

Their work will allow enterprise developers to integrate “production ready” VMware vSphere, Google Container Engine, Bosh, Kubo and Kubernetes. During the keynote it was also announced that VMware and Pivotal were joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation at the platinum level. Pricing and Availability information from the VMware press release: “PKS is expected to become available in calendar Q4 2017. Pricing details to be released upon general availability.”

PKS-Marketecture-Launch-3m_v2-1024x413

Evans Data Cloud Development Survey 2017, Volume 1

The survey of developers currently developing in or deploying to the Cloud was fielded in June 2017 and provides a margin of error of 4.4%. The full 187 page report includes sections on Cloud Developer Demographics, Migrating to a Cloud, Containers, DevOps and the Cloud, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, Mobile IoT and the Cloud, Security and Governance, and much more!

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Developer Marketing and Developer Relations – Audiences, Metrics and ROI

As part of my August 2017 DevRelate webinar, “Developer Marketing & Developer Relations – Similarities & Differences“, August 8 & 10, I’ve put together additional background research and information about several high level aspects for each team member. In this blog post I am focusing on the audiences, metrics and ROI. Take a look at each of the aspects and let me know what you think about the details related to your own experiences and knowledge of industry experts you interact with.

opera-594592_640

Audiences

What are the audiences that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members focus on? In creating the documents, messages, presentations and preparations for meetings, there are many audiences that will be targeted. In my years as a developer, manager, executive and advocate, I have talked to customers at all levels of their organization. I’ve given presentations to focused audiences and also larger diverse audiences. Here is a list of common audience members that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations members talk with, present to and write for.

  • C-Level
  • Division/Department Manager
  • Technical / Development Manager
  • Project Lead / Team Leader
  • Developer / Software Engineer
  • Software Architect
  • Researcher
  • Product/Marketing Manager
  • Business Development
  • ISV
  • OEM
  • Students
  • Hobbyist/Tinkerer/Maker
  • Thought Leaders
  • Authors
  • Editors

folding-rule-1204117_640

Metrics and ROI

Measuring everything that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members do is key to constantly improving outreach, messaging, lead generation and enhancing a company’s top and bottom line. Some metrics and ROI measures are direct and straightforward. Other metrics and ROI measures are harder to directly attribute to specific events, content generated and interactions. Several sure ways to track more results is by coding everything via calls to actions at conferences, meetups, hackathons, meetings, presentations, panels, etc. Adding short URLs for follow up activities, codes to include in product orders, and spaces to tell everyone what why a developer made a decision, purchased a product, attended a follow on event will help add to your metrics and ROI calculations. Here are several metrics and ROI measures that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members should track.

  • Leads
  • Revenue (Direct/Indirect)
  • Developer Satisfaction
  • Net Promoter Score (NPS)
  • Market Share/Growth
  • Technology/Product Adoption
  • Product Quality/Improvements
  • Developer Retention/Renewals
  • Content Creation
  • Followers/Likes/Reposts/Retweets
  • Developer Credibility

 

Additional Webinar Information and Links

You can find additional links and information for the webinar at https://www.devrelate.com/devmktg-devrel-infolinks/.

 

How do you Measure Developer Marketing and Developer Relations activities, time spent, and budget spend?

Send me an email with additional metrics and ROI measures that you use to track your successes, improvements and things to fix. If you have additional developer focused audiences, pass them along as well.

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Benefits of Joining and Staying in a Developer Program

More than 80 percent of developers tell Evans Data, in the Developer Relations Program Survey 2017, that they belong to one or more developer programs (free and/or paid). A majority of developers have consistently told Evans Data that they won’t use a product, service, platform, API, device, framework, library and other technologies if there isn’t an associated active developer community. The top reasons for joining and staying with a technology and a developer community are included in “The Four T’s”: technical support, technical information, training and tools. Being a part of a thriving developer community, developers tell Evans Data that there are three primary benefits that they report to their executives and managers: time saved, increased productivity and improved quality.

DRPInfographic2017

Time Saved

When your developer program provides great documentation, getting started guides, step by step tutorials, sample template projects, pre-built client and server libraries, videos, and code snippets programmers can save time learning your APIs, building applications and reusing code. In the Evans Data Developer Relations Survey 2017,  more than three quarters of developers report that they save time because of their membership. The savings amount to being able to get more work done each week. Being able to access latest updates, bug fixes, and workarounds allows developers to avoid wasting time trying to track down a known problem. Talking with other developers in program forums and newsgroups can also save hours of wasted time that others have already incurred.

stopwatch-1749080_640

 

Increased Productivity

Using great tools, SDKs and content helps developers streamline their design, development, testing and deployment work. Leveraging the work done by your R&D team and developer advocates to help community members results in increased productivity for themselves and their teams. In my years of experience and with feedback from community members, it always helps to have someone show you the best practices and how to(s) for a technology allowing you to focus on what makes your solution unique to your company’s business. Copying sample code and reusing libraries and frameworks also saves time that can be used to work on other development projects.

stopwatch-2061851_640

 

Improved Quality

One of the best measures of developer program membership, according to developers in the recent Evans Data Developer Relations Program survey, is the improvement in the quality of their code. We know that developers write code. At the same time, developers also read code. Being a part of a developer program allows developers to avoid worst practices, talk with other developers about how to performance tune code, find and create workarounds for issues, write unit and system tests, use audits and metrics tools to identify code smells, and more. Hearing about development problems and solutions from other developers in community forums, in articles and on webinars helps another developer avoid the same problems, traps and pitfalls. Being able to access a bug tracking database on  a developer program site will lead to better quality products being built by your customers and your own R&D teams.

feedback-1978036_640

 

Additional Benefits Heard from your Community Members?

Do you have additional developer benefits that you’ve heard from your developer community members? Send me an email with your list.

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/