OK, Code is King! But, where should you put your Developer Relations sample programs?

All developers require a Developer Relations Programs to follow the “3 C’s” – Community, Code and Content. To this list of C’s I also add a few of my own: Collaboration, Continuity, Cooperation, Communication, Caring, Celebration, Civility, Consideration, Clarity, Conversation and Curiosity. In surveys, during conversations, in emails and as the most commonly asked webinar question, developers tell us that Code is King! Even though we provide documentation for SDKs, APIs, libraries, frameworks, systems and applications, the ultimate documentation is the source code itself. The Computer History Museum (CHM) collects the source code for great computer software programs and systems. Do you want to download the source code for MacPaint and QuickDraw created by Bill Atkinson? You can download them both and you can read the story behind the software too! I love what CHM is doing to preserve the source code artifacts of our industry’s history. Developers tell Evans Data that source code examples, sample projects and tutorials are some of the top requirements for a successful developer relations program. So, the question is, where should you put your sample programs so that your developer relations program members can find it, download it and use it?

Developer Relations – where to put your sample programs, tutorials and source code?

There are several places that Developer Relations programs put there source code. Some programs keep their code on their own servers (ftp or http access), some put code in public repositories and others put their source on code hosting sites. There are many sites to choose from including: Amazon S3, Microsoft Azure StorageGitHubSourceForge, DropBoxCloud Forge, BoxCodePlex, Google DriveAssemblaBitBucket, ProjectLocker, and LaunchPad. Most of these sites support the leading source code version control services including Subversion, Git and Mercurial. Some of the hosting sites will also provide additional tools and services like defect tracking, deploy/install, security scanning, and license compliance audits. Several of these sites are popular places to put open source software projects allowing the developer community to collaborate and enhance the sample code. Some of the sites also provide APIs (GitHub Developer for example) for you to automate interactions, search catalogs of entries, access control, and more. Other developer programs place source code on sites to make it simple to distribute and update the code. Most integrated development environments and programmer’s editors support pulling sample code from repositories.

Sample Programs

Where do you put your Developer Relations program and products sample code?

Send me an email and tell me where you put your developer relations program code.

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99

 

Which programming language(s) should your developer platform support?

Depending on the products and services your company provides that are supported by your developer relations program, you will find a large number (or a short list) of programming language you should consider. Of course, you can’t always support every programming language that developers might want to use. Each language choose to support will come with costs including: API interfaces and documentation, source code examples, articles and videos to create, developer tools to test with, developer support, training and more. At the same time, supporting more languages can also extend the developer reach for your company resulting in increased revenue and reputation.

So, how do you decide which programming languages to support? You can look inside your own company, review the Evans Data developer surveys, check out programming language popularity sites, see what developer positions are listed on job boards, look at the programming language popularity on Stack Overflow, searching GitHub projects, factor in the leading platforms and technologies, search for what the top computer science and software engineering schools are teaching and read what tech industry luminaries, bloggers and press write about. If that isn’t enough sources for guidance, you can also use dart and Ouija boards, magic 8-ball and D&D dice (just kidding).

Programming Language(s) Popularity

Here are a few places where you can find information about popular programming languages and programming language rankings.

You Can Support any Programming Language if …

A great benefit of using industry standards for APIs, REST/JSON for example, is that just about every programming language in use today can make REST calls and pass parameters and receive results using JSON. If you are using SOAP, CORBA or some other RPC (probably for legacy systems), you should defintely add support for REST and JSON. Some companies are also exploring the use of Apache Thrift and GraphQL for some of their service APIs. If you interested in microservices for your developer platforms, check out this article “Microservice Showdown – REST vs SOAP vs Apache Thrift (And Why It Matters)“. Also check out this recent article about GitHub adding a GraphQL API “Just Because Github Has a GraphQL API Doesn’t Mean You Should Too“.

Let me know what Programming Language(s) your developer program supports

What programming languages do you support for your developer program and platform? Send me an email!

David I.

davidi@evansdata.com

Twitter: @davidi99