Accelerated Learning Workshops at the Evans Data Developer Relations Conference

In an event unlike any other, developer relations experts from leading companies in the software, telecom and web markets will come together at the 14th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference, March 26-27 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California, to discuss best practices and reveal the techniques behind their success!

New this year: Interactive Workshops

In addition to six keynote presenters and multiple breakout sessions, this year we have also scheduled four interactive workshops during the conference. Each conference attendee will choose to participate in two of the four workshops being held on Tuesday, March 27 at 9am and 10am.

These four workshops will provide accelerated learning for conference attendees to work together to:

  • Build a marketing action plan that creates a sustainable and diverse developer foundation
  • Craft a practitioner content marketing strategy
  • Learn how to segment a developer population that will allow you to expand your reach
  • Plan the launch of an online developer community that is sure to be a success

 

Workshop Sessions, Dates/Times, and Leaders

Here are the four workshop sessions, the date/time when they take place on Tuesday March 27th, and an abstract that describes the workshop in more detail. You can also click on the workshop leader’s name to see their biography.

Workshop: Sustainable Growth Marketing: Building a Developer Ecosystem that Lasts

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 1 Room – 9:00am
Workshop Leader: Kristen Scheven, AngelHack – Chief Marketing Officer

Workshop Abstract

People throw around the term growth hacking often, but very rarely does it lead to community growth that lasts. During this workshop, we’ll build a marketing action plan that focuses on creating a sustainable and diverse developer foundation through content marketing, email drip campaigns, developer outreach and complementary innovation programs.

Workshop: The A to Z of Practitioner Content Marketing

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 1 Room – 10:00am
Workshop Leaders: Yolanda Fintschenko, Ph.D., Fixate IO – Co-Founder and Chris Riley, Fixate IO – Co-Founder

Workshop Abstract

In this workshop, we will define practitioner content marketing and how it compares to public relations, demand gen, and influencer marketing. We will then build a practitioner content marketing strategy with workshop participants.

Marketing is moving from using a megaphone to creating targeted conversations. Developers do not respond well to traditional marketing, but they also do not want to be the last to know about features, functionality, and techniques. They look for vendors that can impart technical value with each piece of content they put out and ignore obvious product promotion pieces unless they include content that makes tool or technique adoption easier.

Having these targeted technical conversations requires a new strategy — practitioner content marketing. Practitioners who sit outside your organization but are willing to put their name on content for your organization is more credible, results in better quality leads, and increases your company’s share of voice in conversations important for your industry segment. Practitioner content market is a way to let the market, prospects, and customers know that you speak their language and can provide value beyond features and functionality.

Workshop: Benchmarking Developer Program Offerings and Quantifying User Satisfaction

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 2 Room – 9:00am
Workshop Leader: Michael Rasalan, Evans Data – Director of Research

Workshop Abstract

To accurately target the developer market for your tools and services, segmentation is vital. This is commonly done by classifying developers by the types of applications they create. This typology is valuable and delivers results focused on developer targets, but sometimes you might want to look at developers by other segments.

This interactive workshop looks at how various ways to segment the developer population and provides a jumping off point for examining developers that will allow you to expand your reach.

Workshop: Building the Ideal Developer Community

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 2 Room – 10:00am
Workshop Leader: Matt Schmidt, DZone – President

Workshop Abstract

A key component of a mature developer relations strategy is the effective use of community. How do developers on your team communicate and collaborate? What is the average amount of time it takes them to get answers? What if you could reduce the amount to time your team spends hunting down resources and resolving issues? A productive and engaged developer community can help your company reach its goals faster and cheaper, but it doesn’t happen overnight.

Attend our workshop for a hands-on planning workshop that walks attendees through the process of launching an online developer community that is sure to be a success.

Additional Conference Links

 

Register for the Conference to Reserve your Place!

See you at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto for this one of a kind conference that brings together developer ecosystem strategists, developer marketing, and developer relations professionals to meet, exchange ideas, forge partnerships, and share insights on developer ecosystem development.

Six and Half Million Developers Now Using AI or ML in Their Projects

Are the developers in your community using AI and Machine Learning (ML) in their projects? Does your company provide AI and ML technologies and products for developers to use? According to recent developer research by Evans Data Corporation, software developers are adopting and using artificial intelligence and machine learning by the millions, according to Evans Data’s newly released Global Development and Demographics Study. Twenty-nine percent of developers worldwide, or 6,452,000 in all, are currently using some form of AI or ML and an additional 5.8 million expect to within the next six months. Others expect to incorporate AI or ML techniques later in the future, with only 18%, or slightly less than 4 million, having no plans to ever use these technologies. The Asia-Pacific region is the strongest with almost 3 million developers currently using these technologies.

At the AWS re:Invent conference last November, Amazon and Intel announced DeepLens – “The world’s first deep learning enabled video camera for developers.” According to Amazon, “AWS DeepLens helps put deep learning in the hands of developers, literally, with a fully programmable video camera, tutorials, code, and pre-trained models designed to expand deep learning skills.” Developers can pre-order the camera and SDK now for delivery in Spring of this year.

Six and Half Million Developers Now Using AI or ML in Their Projects

The Global Developer Population and Demographic Study, now in its 25th edition, is the definitive developer population estimate, updated every six months. The result of extensive secondary research, the study finds 22 million developers worldwide with projections to reach 26.1 million within five years. Global survey data laid atop the population estimates show technology adoption figures worldwide as well as by region.

“There’s been a huge uptake for AI and ML technologies by developers.” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp, “Not only have the tools and frameworks multiplied and matured and made adoption much easier, but the developers themselves show a great deal of excitement about using them and enhancing their applications with these new capabilities.”

Population trends and estimates cover many different types of development in the most recent study. Additional points discovered in this edition include: 9.9 million developers involved with optimizing security solutions in their organizations, with 1.8 million developers focused on this in North America, and 16.5 million developers working in organizations having a formal DevOps strategy. In DevOps both the APAC and EMEA regions top North America for number of developers.

The new Global Development Population and Demographics Study provides developer population estimates by region and for major countries within regions as well as worldwide estimates and growth projections. Demographic estimates include age, gender, years experience, education and more. Technology adoption estimates include Host and Target Platform Adoption and Migration, Development Methodologies, Tool use, Tech adoption, High Performance Computing, and other topics.

See the complete “Global Developer Population and Demographic Study” Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

About Evans Data Corporation

Evans Data Corporation provides regularly updated IT industry market intelligence based on in-depth surveys of the global developer population. Evans’ syndicated research includes surveys focused on developers in a wide variety of subjects.

 

 

Know your Developers and Creating Personas – webinar info and links

This week, I am presenting a DevRelate webinar, “Know your Developers and Creating Personas” on Tuesday (June 20) and Thursday (June 22). Creating developer personas is one of the first steps to applying more modern developer marketing techniques in a technology world that is more and more individualized. This DevRelate webinar introduces you to different types of developers. This blog post contains additional information and links covered in the webinar.

Know your Developers

 

Creating Personas

Discovering Developer Personas Specific to Your Technology – Evans Data Research Service

Understanding the personas of your targeted developer segments allows you to:

  • Communicate more clearly with each persona
  • Provide the tools and technologies each persona uses
  • Provide the level and type of support each expects
  • Find developers that match the personas for effective outreach
  • Understand where each persona can be reached

Developer Personas I have Known – a DevRelate blog post.

 

Developer Program Workshops and Assessments

Evans Data’s Developer Program Advisory provides expert program guidance through workshops and assessments from proven program leaders to help make your program the best it can be. Contact us today for a free consultation.

 

Non-industrial Commercial Deployments Top Developers’ IoT Targets

In past DevRelate blog posts, I’ve covered Developer Relations outreach for both consumer, commercial and industrial IoT. In my home I have consumer grade smart thermostats, motion detectors, lights, and water leak detectors. The Evans Data Internet of Things vertical research service focuses on developers working on projects for connected devices in the Internet of Things, whether they’re for transportation, home automation, smarter cities, retail, industry or any other type of interconnected applications.

Top IoT Development Targets

Today, Evans Data reported that more developers (57%) working on Internet of Things projects are targeting deployments related to commercial but not industrial implementations than any other type, according to Evans Data’s recently released Internet of Things Development Study. These include implementations such as healthcare, eCommerce, retail and finance. The survey of 840 developers worldwide who are actively working on Internet of Things projects also showed that 52% were targeting consumer directed implementations such as connected home, consumer wearables, transportation, and so on, while 43% target industrial deployments. Many of the categories are not mutually exclusive and developers could select as many as applicable. On average developers selected 1.4 categories.

IoTDev2017v1

Those developers in the APAC region were more likely to target consumer deployments, while those in EMEA and North America showed a preference for commercial non-industrial implementations.

“Just a little while ago when we looked at IoT targets the field was dominated by industrial implementations,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data. “Today we don’t see less industrial targeting, but what we do see is more awareness, excitement and thus targeting towards other categories of IoT implementations. This is a natural sign of the whole IoT development industry evolving and becoming more mature.”

A drill down into the popular consumer category showed that primary targets are: business to consumer ecommerce, entertainment/infotainment, security and surveillance, and connected home / home appliances.

Evans Data Corp’s Internet of Things Development Study is part of the continuing Internet of Things Vertical service which is published year round studying developers working on internet of Things projects and their applications. It covers a broad range of aspects including:, The IoT Landscape, Demographics, Firmographics, Platform Adoption, the IoT Development Lifecycle, Complementary Technologies to IoT, Technology Adoption and more.

See the complete Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents

Does your Developer Relations Program focus on IoT developers and development?

I would love to explore your consumer, commercial and industrial IoT focused developer programs. Send me an email with your developer program URL so that I can join and take a look.

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99

World Wide Population of Young Developers, age 30 and younger, Tops 5.5 million

Back in April 2017, Evans Data recently reported that “Software Developers Getting Younger, More Gender Diverse“. The median age of today’s software developers has decreased overall on a worldwide basis and the number of women developers has increased, according to Evans Data’s recently released Developer Marketing 2017 survey report. This week, Evans Data reports that the world wide population of younger developers age 30 and younger has topped 5.5 million according to Evans Data’s newly released Developer Population and Demographics Study. The bi-annual study builds on over ten years of trended data, exhaustive primary and secondary research and a sophisticated model to estimate current developer populations and make projections for the future.

Younger Developers

I can remember seeing more younger faces in my audiences during my many visits to developers in South Korea, China, Japan, Russia, Brazil, Costa Rica and Argentina. While I would also see older developers on all of my stops, especially in the US, Germany and UK, it was always energizing to see so many new and young developers.

I also have had numerous opportunities to visit college campuses and see the next generation of developers learning new technologies, methods, languages, platforms, services, devices and frameworks. I always feel younger, when I step into a computer science and software engineering lab at a university, college, coding boot camp, hackathon and meetup. For any developer relations professionals who are feeling tired or a bit older, go visit a coding camp or a college campus on one our your tours. You’ll forget the miles and lack of sleep.

In the opening session at this week’s Apple’s World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC 2017), CEO Tim Cook showed two pictures of iOS app developers. The youngest was from Australia aged 10 years old with 6 apps in the app store. The other developer was from Japan with one app in the app store and was 82 years young.

 

Global-DevPop2017v1 Younger Developers
Developers 30 and younger account for more than a million more developers than those older than 45. However, the largest concentration of developers is between 30 and 45 years of age. The APAC region has a particularly large percent of developers in the youngest age categories, while developers in North America and EMEA tend to be older.

Also by 2021, India is projected to be the country with the largest software developer population worldwide, topping the United States, which currently has the largest countrywide developer population. China is projected to continue to be third in developer population. Both growth predictions when coupled with the current relative ages by region show a rejuvenation of the software development community worldwide.

“It’s natural to see the population numbers of young developers increasing in the emerging regions,” said Janel Garvin, CEO of Evans Data Corp. “Not only are they younger in comparison to other regions, but those emerging regions are showing a total population growth rate that is higher than the EMEA region or North America.”

Evans Data Corp’s Global Development Population and Demographics Study is the de facto standard in developer population estimates. The study, which is now in its 22nd edition, estimates not only current software developer populations across four major regions and forty different countries, but also overlays global primary research onto the population numbers to show numbers of developers forecast to adopt technologies now and in the future.

See the complete Global Developer Population and Demographic Study 2017 Vol. 1 Table of Contents and Methodology here: Table of Contents.

Evans Data recommends clients use this survey in combination with it’s companion survey series; the Global Development Survey series, in order to completely understand the full scope and complexity of the developer layout worldwide. Knowing the demographic, firmographic and psychographic  makeup of your developer population, their interests, and their use of technology will help you tailor your developer marketing outreach worldwide, regionally and locally.

DRC 2017 recap: “Our Journey to a Growing Developer Program”, Susie Wee – Cisco

Susie Wee, VP and CTO of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems, gave a presentation at our recent 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference. The following is a recap of her session, “Our Journey to a Growing Developer Program”. [David I note: the graphics used in this blog post were not part of the presentation slide deck]

Susie started her session by asking the audience a few questions to understand who was attending and what they wanted to get out of her talk. A great way to start any presentation in order to make any “course corrections” to help the audience.

Cisco DevNet APIs

Susie mentioned that the Cisco DevNet developer network started about 3 years ago. Before that time Cisco had a series of APIs and SDKs for developers but no real developer program and community. What Cisco had was more of a partner community to resell Cisco products. Certifications were offered for the partners. You could ask a couple of questions about the early outreach to developers: why does Cisco have a developer program and isn’t Cisco a networking hardware company?

She explained that Cisco DevNet is a developer community and an innovation ecosystem. Technologies that are available to developers include: Internet of Things, Software Defined Networking, Cloud computing, Collaboration technologies (many developers will recognize Cisco Jabber), Security solutions, Data Center offerings, DevOps solutions, Services and Open Source.

As part of Susie’s talk and also the main focus on the upcoming DevNet Create Conference (May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco, CA), one of the main themes follows the sentence template of “Where Applications Meet xxx”. Developers who build applications should be able to easily fill in the “xxx” with some of the following: Infrastructure, Things (IoT), Places, People, Design, Architecture, Microservices, Deployment, Security, Analytics, etc. Between the apps that are developed there are interfaces to connect those apps to, well, everything! That is part of what Cisco provides beyond their traditional networking solutions.

Cisco DevNet Create

Susie explained how Cisco DevNet focuses on helping developers:

 

She mentioned that DevNet has more than 415,000 members, who work in more than 24,000 companies, provides 252 learning labs, provides 80 active APIs and more than 170 yearly developer outreach events.

Key to the success of Cisco DevNet are a laser focus on solving three key challenges: how to operate as a developer program, provide a clear value proposition for developers, and continue to grow a fiercely loyal developer community.

One of the stories that Susie mentioned was how DevNet attached itself onto the popular Cisco Live conferences that are help throughout the world. They put together all of their developer learning materials and created a DevNet zone on the side of the main conference. Attendees walked past the area and started telling their friends that there are cool learning labs over in this corner of the conference area. The buzz started to spread among attendees that there was a lab where you could develop software to integrate with Cisco technologies. John Chambers and his Cisco management team stopped by and saw what was happening in the DevNet theater and hands on lab. Now, at Cisco Live, the DevNet zone is the busiest section – Cool!

DevNet – 5 Lessons Learned

Susie shared the 5 lessons that they’ve learned during DevNet’s journey:

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5) Operate like a startup and build up your developer credibility

4) Play to your strengths and build a technically talented “extended” team

3) Make your developer members heroes inside their companies and also in their communities

2) Help your team be wildly successful and ensure that your community has a heart

1) Innovate, Innovate, Innovate.

Innovate or Be Left Behind

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Developers have to solve big problems. A developer program’s mission is to help developers build innovative solutions for their companies and their customers. Your developer program has to continue to provide innovative features, content and tools that will help your developer members create innovative applications. Our industry moves forward, fast. Developers move forward, fast. If your developer program does not innovate to keep up with developer needs, your company and your developer program will be left in the dust.

Thank you, Susie Wee and Cisco, for being a part of our 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference.

Additional Information

Cisco DevNet  – https://developer.cisco.com/

DevNet Create Conference (May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco, CA)

Susie Wee’s session live stream replay is available on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ciscodevnet/videos/1962907540605184/

Session Title: DevNet: Fostering innovation where applications meet infrastructure

Session Description: How did a networking company start behaving like a software company and build a thriving developer community? How is DevNet achieving scale by engaging a broader internal and external community? The mission of Cisco DevNet is to provide developers with the tools, resources and code they need to create innovative, network-enabled solutions. But it’s more than just the technologies – DevNet is fostering innovation to help developers create seriously cool stuff. Join Susie Wee as she shares the successes, challenges and lessons learned in building a successful joint developer and innovation program, as well as what’s next for the DevNet community.

SusieWee

Susie Wee – VP and CTO of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems

 

Bio:

Susie is the Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems. She is the founder of DevNet, Cisco’s developer program for infrastructure and application developers, which catalyzes innovation by the developer ecosystem. DevNet covers the breadth of Cisco’s portfolio including networking, cloud, data center, security, collaboration and IoT. The innovations from DevNet improve end user experience, the operational experience and developer experience with the network. Under her leadership, the DevNet community has grown to over 400,000 developers in less than three years.

Prior to her current role, Susie was the Vice President and Chief Technology and Experience Officer of Cisco’s Collaboration Technology Group where she was responsible for driving innovation and experience design in Cisco’s collaboration products and software services, including unified communications, telepresence, web and video conferencing, and cloud collaboration. Before joining Cisco, Susie was the founding Vice President of Experience Software Business and CTO at Hewlett Packard, and Lab Director at HP Labs. Susie was the co-editor of the JPSEC standard for the security of JPEG-2000 images. She was formerly an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Circuits, Systems and Video Technology and IEEE Transactions on Image Processing. While at HP Labs, Susie was a consulting assistant professor at Stanford University where she co-taught a graduate-level course on digital video processing.

Susie received Technology Review’s Top 100 Young Innovators award, ComputerWorld’s Top 40 Innovators under 40 award, the Red Dot Design Concept award for augmented collaboration, the INCITs Technical Excellence award, the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame award, and was on the Forbes Most Powerful Women list. She is an IEEE Fellow for her contributions in multimedia technology and has over 50 international publications and 57 granted patents. Susie received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.