Webinar February 27 & March 1, 2018 – Internal Evangelism and Enablement to Support your Developer Program

 

DevRelate Webinar February 27 & March 1, 2018 – Internal Evangelism and Enablement to Support your Developer Program.

Developer Relations team members spend most of their time doing external evangelism to their developer community and prospects. At the same time, it is even more important to have an active and ongoing focus on internal evangelism to keep key stakeholders and departments aware of what you are doing while eliciting their help and guidance for your efforts.

To some, it might seem like quite a task but it can be accomplished by setting up enabling internal technologies and systems to make it easy for employees beyond your developer relations team to support your efforts.

This webinar will cover multiple ways for you to keep your company up to date while garnering their continued support and provide assistance with your content generation and activities.

Dates/Times:

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

  • 7am Pacific Time, 9am Central Time, 10am Eastern Time, 3pm London, 4pm Frankfurt
  • 1pm Pacific Time, 3pm Central Time, 4pm Eastern Time
  • 5pm Pacific Time, 7pm Central Time, 8pm Eastern Time, 9am Beijing (Wed, Feb 28), 12noon Sydney (Wed, Feb 28)

Thursday, March 1, 2018

  • 7am Pacific Time, 9am Central Time, 10am Eastern Time, 3pm London, 4pm Frankfurt
  • 10am Pacific Time, 12noon Central Time, 1pm Eastern Time, 6pm London, 7pm Frankfurt

This webinar takes place on several days and at multiple times.

Please register for the date and time that works best for you:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6662625237414693123

Agenda:

  1. The value of Internal Evangelism
  2. Where External Evangelism Meets Internal Evangelism
  3. Creating Enabling Internal Technologies and Systems for Use Beyond your DevRel Team
  4. Q&A

Who Should Attend:

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Advocates
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities

Register Now

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6662625237414693123

 

Effectively Communicating with Developers – Webinar Information and Links

Developers are a special category of computer users. Effectively communicating with developers involves creating the right content, including technical information, and speaking in terms that developers appreciate. The January 2018 DevRelate webinar discusses several ways in which you can effectively communicate with an audience of developers.

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities

Agenda:

1) Choosing topics of interest to developers
2) Preparing your technical communication and information details
3) Creating effective in-person, email, social media, and online communcations
4) Q&A

 

Additional Webinar Information and Links

Aspects of Effective Content, Events, Emails & News – here are some of the area that I covered in the webinar

  • Compelling Topics
  • Awesome Developer Success Story
  • Source Code, Template Projects
  • “Boring” content formatting
  • Development Journey / Learning Paths
  • Great presenter/author

 

Topics of Interest to Developers

  • Answers
  • Tips and Tricks
  • How To(s)
  • Modern Methods
  • Use Cases
  • Getting Started
  • New Skills
  • Technology Directions
  • Product Roadmaps
  • Business Opportunities

 

Evans Data Tactical Marketing Reports

Evans Data reaches out to its global developer panel to produce two annual tactical marketing reports: Developer Marketing Survey Report and Developer Relations Survey Report. The Developer Marketing Survey contains software developers’ attitudes about marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaigns. The Developer Relations Survey examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program and advocacy.

DevRelate Webinar January 16 & 18, 2018 – Effectively Communicating with Developers

Developers are a special category of computer users. Effectively communicating with developers involves creating the right content, including technical information, and speaking in terms that developers appreciate.

This webinar will discuss several ways in which you can effectively communicate with an audience of developers.

Dates and Times:

  • Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – 7am Santa Cruz Pacific Time, 9am Central Time, 10am Eastern Time, 3pm BST London, 4pm CST Frankfurt
  • Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – 1pm Santa Cruz Pacific Time, 3pm Central Time, 4pm Eastern Time, 9pm BST London, 10pm CST Frankfurt
  • Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – 5pm Santa Cruz Pacific Time, 9am CST Beijing (Wednesday, Jan 17),12noon AEDT Sydney (Wednesday, Jan 17)
  • Thursday, January 18, 2018 – 7am Santa Cruz Pacific Time, 9am Central Time, 10am Eastern Time, 3pm BST London, 4pm CST Frankfurt
  • Thursday, January 18, 2018 – 10am Santa Cruz Pacific Time, 12noon Central Time, 1pm Eastern Time, 6pm BST London, 7pm CST Frankfurt

This webinar occurs several times. Please register for the date and time that works best for you:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7040638433887400194

 

 

Agenda:

1) Choosing topics of interest to developers
2) Preparing your technical communication and information details
3) Creating effective in-person, email, social media, and online communcations
4) Q&A

 

Who Should Attend:

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Advocates
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities

 

Register Now!

 

DevRel Best Practices Part 2 – Webinar Information and Links

During the DevRelate November webinar we’ll be covering Part 2 of our series focused on Developer Marketing and Developer Relations Best Practices. In this blog post you’ll find additional information and links for topics covered in the webinar. Bookmark this page and come back during November for additional updates.

Webinar Agenda

  1. Reasons for Joining and Staying in a Developer Program
  2. Developer Relations Best Practices Part 2
  3. Q&A

 

Best Practices Areas Covered in Part 2

  • Events & Activities
  • API Sandboxes, Virtual Labs, Cloud Instances
  • App Stores & Application showcases
  • Community Chat Systems
  • Training & Certification
  • Popular Blogging Topics
  • Programming Languages to Support

 

Popularity of Programming Languages

  • Tiobe Index – Updated once a month, the Tiobe Index is calculated by using multiple search engines looking for the number of skilled engineers, courses and third party vendors. You can read more about how the Tiobe Index is computed on their website.
  • Redmonk Programming Language Rankings – The Redmonk ranking appears bi-annually and appears on Stephen O’Grady’s blog. The latest version, “The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2017” appeared on his blog on March 17, 2017. The ranking is based on code on GitHub and discussions on Stack Overflow. The ranking correlates programming language discussions and usage on these two popular sites.
  • PYPL: PopularitY of Programming Language Index – This index is created by analyzing how often programming language tutorials are searched using Google. The index page says “If you believe in collective wisdom, the PYPL Popularity of Programming Language index can help you decide which language to study, or which one to use in a new software project.”
  • Indeed Job Trends – Using the Indeed search system you can get some trending results for Job Postings and Job Seeker Interest. Using the interface, you can string together a query based on adding a series of programming languages.
  • Programming Languages used in Elementary and High Schools – In the US the College Board’s AP Computer Science exam uses the Java programming language. Previously programming languages including C++, Modula-2 and Pascal were used. You can also find other programming languages used in secondary education to prepare students for college and work force placement. The languages used in elementary and high schools can often depend on the skills of the teachers and will normally include the use of  Python, Scratch, JavaScript, Alice and others. The ACM Model Curriculum for K-12 Computer Science gives guidance for schools but does not push a specific programming language.
  • Programming Languages Taught in College Computer Science – Different college computer science departments choose programming languages that are used as the first course and some focus on a language in the core computer science classes. Stanford University used to teach Java but recent news articles report that Stanford has moved from Java to JavaScript for their introduction to programming course. While C++, Java, JavaScript and other programming languages are taught in schools, most universities also cover a wide range of programming languages, algorithms, data structures and technologies to help prepare graduates for their move into industry, research and teaching.

 

OPENAPI and Swagger

With the Swagger YAML and/or JSON files you can use Swagger’s CodeGen tool to create bindings for more than 20 server side languages and more than 40 client side languages.

 

Evans Data Tactical Marketing Reports

Evans Data reaches out to its global developer panel to produce two annual tactical marketing reports: Developer Marketing Survey Report and Developer Relations Survey Report. The Developer Marketing Survey contains software developers’ attitudes about marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaigns. The Developer Relations Survey examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program and advocacy.

 

DevRelate Webinar Nov 16 & 28 : Developer Relations Best Practices (Part 2)

Back in January 2017 we presented the first in a series of Developer Relations Best Practices, “Developer Relations Best Practices and Tools of the Trade“, focused on several aspects you’ll find in a well run developer outreach program. In that webinar we covered seven developer program best practices including: Social Media, Blogs, Newsletters, Webinars, Videos, Documentation and Answers.

In Part 2 of the Developer Relations Best Practices webinar series we’ll cover: events & activities, API sandboxes & virtual labs, app stores & application showcases, community chat systems, training & certification, popular blogging topics, and the programming languages you should support.

The developer relations best practices webinar content is supported by Evans Data Tactical Developer Marketing (Developer Marketing 2017 Survey and Developer Relations 2017 Survey) research results.

Agenda

1) Reasons for Joining and Staying in a Developer Program
2) Developer Relations Best Practices Part 2
3) Q&A

Dates and Times

This webinar is offered multiple times on Tuesday, November 16th and Tuesday, November 28th. Select the date and time that works best for you. Use the pull down date/time box on the GoToWebinar registration page to select the session you want to attend. Register here!

Thursday (November 16, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 1pm Pacific Standard Time (3pm CST, 4pm EST, 9PM GMT, 10pm CET)
  • 5pm Pacific Standard Time (9am CST Beijing November 17, 12noon AEDT Sydney November 17)

Tuesday (November 28, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 10am Pacific Standard Time (12pm CST, 1pm EST, 6pm GMT, 7pm CET)

 

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Evangelists
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

The insights provided in this webinar stem from years of experience and the direct input from a global panel of software developers about what works for them and what doesn’t.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or enhancing a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get! Register Now!

 

The Twelve C’s – Webinar Information and Links

During the week of the October 2017 DevRelate webinar series, additional information and links will appear on this page. Bookmark this page and come back as the webinars take place.

Evans Data Tactical Marketing Reports

Evans Data reaches out to its global developer panel to produce two annual tactical marketing reports: Developer Marketing Survey Report and Developer Relations Survey Report. The Developer Marketing Survey contains software developers’ attitudes about marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaigns. The Developer Relations Survey examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program and advocacy.

 

The Twelve C’s (in no specific priority order except for the first 3)

  • Community – the main place where your development team, developer relations team and members will take part in your program, gain insights, solve problems, find answers and learn new tips, tricks and techniques.
  • Content – the videos, quick start guides, documentation, tutorials, white papers, blog posts and other valuable content.
  • Code – everyone will where most developers will spend a good portion of their time reading and writing programs. Developers love to write code, they also love to read it and share it with other developers.
  • Communication – developers like to talk to other developers. Developers also like to interact with the software engineers that create the tools, SDKs, APIs and content .
  • Collaboration – there are very few “lone” developers. Most developers work in teams, interact with other developers in their company, in their community and online in developer sites. Creating as many ways to foster collaboration by your team and your members is a sure sign of a vibrant and supportive community.
  • Contests – many developers like challenges. Some will enter programming contests and take part on hackathons. If you are creating online contests, make sure they run for a longer period of time that the typical weekend hackathon.
  • Champions – Look for the best of the best in your developer community. You’ll find them active in most aspects of your program and site. You can use gamification to identify top contributors and helpers. Give your champions a special
  • Conversations – make sure your developer program provides multiple ways for developers and your team to have conversations. These features can include forums/newsgroups, threaded conversations, posting comments on code,  content, bug reports, etc.
  • Cooperation – allow your partners and program members to help you by cooperating on bug triage, helping answer questions, participate in software testing, helping other developers with coding work, and more.
  • Contribution – allow your developer program members to contribute blog posts, add to your documentation wikis, input knowledge in the form of tips, tricks, techniques and lessons learned. If you have a bug reporting system (who doesn’t) allow community members to provide workarounds and source code fixes that work.
  • Certification – providing online and in person courses creates a more literate developer community. Providing an infrastructure for testing and certifying developers and the apps they build gives program members and their companies a higher status in your ecosystem. Some developer programs are also cooperating with local schools and online MOOCs to provide certificates of learning for technologies and your products, services, devices, APIs, tools, etc. The Google NanoDegree given by Udacity is one example of the modern way to train and certify developers. Most app stores also have test and certification systems for your apps.
  • Celebration – programming is fun (at least it is for me). Celebrating this unique form of creation and art should happen all the time in your developer program. Let your members vote for the apps, developers, MVPs, partners of the month and year (we see the same example in employee of the month/year in a lot of companies). Celebrate the release of a new product, a new partner integration, and a new capability. I even know a developer who told me that his company has “software and systems retirement” parties when they shut down and replace an application.