Accelerated Learning Workshops at the Evans Data Developer Relations Conference

In an event unlike any other, developer relations experts from leading companies in the software, telecom and web markets will come together at the 14th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference, March 26-27 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California, to discuss best practices and reveal the techniques behind their success!

New this year: Interactive Workshops

In addition to six keynote presenters and multiple breakout sessions, this year we have also scheduled four interactive workshops during the conference. Each conference attendee will choose to participate in two of the four workshops being held on Tuesday, March 27 at 9am and 10am.

These four workshops will provide accelerated learning for conference attendees to work together to:

  • Build a marketing action plan that creates a sustainable and diverse developer foundation
  • Craft a practitioner content marketing strategy
  • Learn how to segment a developer population that will allow you to expand your reach
  • Plan the launch of an online developer community that is sure to be a success

 

Workshop Sessions, Dates/Times, and Leaders

Here are the four workshop sessions, the date/time when they take place on Tuesday March 27th, and an abstract that describes the workshop in more detail. You can also click on the workshop leader’s name to see their biography.

Workshop: Sustainable Growth Marketing: Building a Developer Ecosystem that Lasts

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 1 Room – 9:00am
Workshop Leader: Kristen Scheven, AngelHack – Chief Marketing Officer

Workshop Abstract

People throw around the term growth hacking often, but very rarely does it lead to community growth that lasts. During this workshop, we’ll build a marketing action plan that focuses on creating a sustainable and diverse developer foundation through content marketing, email drip campaigns, developer outreach and complementary innovation programs.

Workshop: The A to Z of Practitioner Content Marketing

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 1 Room – 10:00am
Workshop Leaders: Yolanda Fintschenko, Ph.D., Fixate IO – Co-Founder and Chris Riley, Fixate IO – Co-Founder

Workshop Abstract

In this workshop, we will define practitioner content marketing and how it compares to public relations, demand gen, and influencer marketing. We will then build a practitioner content marketing strategy with workshop participants.

Marketing is moving from using a megaphone to creating targeted conversations. Developers do not respond well to traditional marketing, but they also do not want to be the last to know about features, functionality, and techniques. They look for vendors that can impart technical value with each piece of content they put out and ignore obvious product promotion pieces unless they include content that makes tool or technique adoption easier.

Having these targeted technical conversations requires a new strategy — practitioner content marketing. Practitioners who sit outside your organization but are willing to put their name on content for your organization is more credible, results in better quality leads, and increases your company’s share of voice in conversations important for your industry segment. Practitioner content market is a way to let the market, prospects, and customers know that you speak their language and can provide value beyond features and functionality.

Workshop: Benchmarking Developer Program Offerings and Quantifying User Satisfaction

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 2 Room – 9:00am
Workshop Leader: Michael Rasalan, Evans Data – Director of Research

Workshop Abstract

To accurately target the developer market for your tools and services, segmentation is vital. This is commonly done by classifying developers by the types of applications they create. This typology is valuable and delivers results focused on developer targets, but sometimes you might want to look at developers by other segments.

This interactive workshop looks at how various ways to segment the developer population and provides a jumping off point for examining developers that will allow you to expand your reach.

Workshop: Building the Ideal Developer Community

Date/Time: Tuesday March 27 – Track 2 Room – 10:00am
Workshop Leader: Matt Schmidt, DZone – President

Workshop Abstract

A key component of a mature developer relations strategy is the effective use of community. How do developers on your team communicate and collaborate? What is the average amount of time it takes them to get answers? What if you could reduce the amount to time your team spends hunting down resources and resolving issues? A productive and engaged developer community can help your company reach its goals faster and cheaper, but it doesn’t happen overnight.

Attend our workshop for a hands-on planning workshop that walks attendees through the process of launching an online developer community that is sure to be a success.

Additional Conference Links

 

Register for the Conference to Reserve your Place!

See you at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto for this one of a kind conference that brings together developer ecosystem strategists, developer marketing, and developer relations professionals to meet, exchange ideas, forge partnerships, and share insights on developer ecosystem development.

Developer Relations “Fireside Chat” with Guy Kawasaki and David I. – Tuesday March 27, 2018

At the upcoming 14th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference (DRC2018), Guy Kawasaki will participate in a “Fireside Chat” with David Intersimone “David I”. During the keynote, David I will ask Guy Kawasaki a series of questions covering developer relations best practice and experiences. They’ll also take questions from conference attendees. This keynote session will take place on Tuesday, March 27 at 11:15am at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California.

Guy Kawasaki was chief evangelist of Apple and David was chief evangelist for Borland/Embarcadero Technologies’ Developer Tools Group.

About Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. He is on the board of trustees of the Wikimedia Foundation, a brand ambassador for Mercedes Benz USA, and an executive fellow of the Haas School of Business (UC Berkeley). He was also the chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of the Start 2.0, The Art of Social Media, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

Guy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GuyKawasaki

Guy on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/

Guy’s Website: https://guykawasaki.com/

 

About David Intersimone “David I”

David Intersimone, known to many as David I, is a passionate and innovative software industry veteran who extols and educates the world on developer tools, software development and software architectures. David I joined Borland Software in 1985 where he practically invented Developer Relations. During David I’s forty-three years as a developer, development manager, developer community executive and chief evangelist, he has created a thriving global developer community, thousands of articles, videos and blog posts.

Before Embarcadero acquired the developer tools business from Borland Software, David spent more than 20 years with Borland in various evangelism, engineering, and development capacities, including creating the company’s developer relations program.

Today, David I shares his visions and insights as a pioneer in developer relations with program managers and directors through Evans Data’s Developer Program Advisory where he gives workshops, guidance and advice on program creation and enhancement and through the DevRelate Developer Program community website.

David I on Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidi99

David I on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

David I’s DevRelate blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/

 

Join us at the Evans Data 14th Annual Developer Relations Conference

The conference takes place on March 26 and 27, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California. There is also a Sunday, March 25 Developer Relations Bootcamp strategic workshop that provides a solid foundation on which you can build or enhance your developer program. Concentrated sessions in this one-day instructional program provide the insight and actionable information you can use to build your brand and establish strong relationships with your developer community.

During the two day conference the keynotes, sessions and workshops will cover all aspects of developer relations, ranging from the business side (program ROI, the connection between developer programs and company revenue, budgeting for/costs of developer programs, how to get an organization’s commitment of internal resources, etc.) to the marketing side (techniques for recruitment, awareness tactics, community loyalty building programs, legal/privacy and global privacy considerations, conducting a privacy audit, internationalizing a US-based developer program, etc), and much more.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or building on a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get – and this is the place to get it!

In an event unlike any other, developer relations experts from leading companies in the software, telecom and web markets will come together to discuss best practices and reveal the techniques behind their success!

You’ll find additional Developer Relations Conference information, keynote presenters, speakers and conference schedule on the DRC2018 Web Site.

 

10 Step Event/Webinar Process to Purchase

When you are preparing for an event, meetup, webinar or other activity and you want to build an effective outreach to developers in your community, you can follow 10 steps to create interest, start the engagement, lead your members to prepare and participate, and create a catalog of digital assets that you can use to drive their journey to purchase.

  1. Create a blog/news item on a technical topic to start your developer member’s interest and engender engagement.
  2. Create the Event/Webinar – invite developers.
  3. Create 2-3 short teaser videos (like you see for movies that have “trailer” and “teaser” clips to drive interest and social buzz) and post these to developer social media portals.
  4. Hire a subject matter expert/author to create an Independent Expert White Paper (20-60 pages depending on the complexity of the architecture and technology) with supporting information for the topic area.
  5. Encourage developers to download the available materials in advance of the event/webinar to prepare for and follow along with the presentation.
  6. Run the Event/Webinar in multiple locations / time zones. Remember that developers have different schedules and are located in different countries.
  7. Package the slides, demos, and notes for reuse by team members, partners, and other leaders in your community.
  8. Create a landing page with all of the videos, code/project samples and demos, slides, technical paper, and additional info/links
  9. Email all of the attendees/no shows and other community members with links to the landing page. Track their progress in using the materials with tracking links.
  10. Nurture all of those interested in the topic with additional information and offers based on their individual path(s) along the journey.

Creating all of these reusable assets and collecting them together into landing pages and placing them in an easy to find catalog on your developer community site will allow members to quickly follow a learning path and enter at a point in their development journey based on their interest area and technical level.

This 10 step process was covered in the recent DevRelate Webinar, “Effectively Communicating with Developers“. Additional information about this webinar is available on the webinar’s information links page and on the webinar replay page (DevRelate memberships required).

 

 

A Developer by Any Other Name

We often get asked how many developers there are working in the world. This sounds like a simple question and at the same time the term “developer” does not fully convey the spectrum of how a developer self describes who they are and what they do.  If I refined a developer more specifically as a “professional developer” would that create a clearer definition as someone who gets paid for programming? Is having the professional developer moniker mean that they have a related job title, use a specific number of programming languages, spend a specific amount of time developing, know a wide range of development tools, platforms, frameworks, libraries and architectures? Depending on who you talk with, there are many additional titles and terms we use to talk about who and what a developer is.

How Developers Self Identify?

There are many ways to talk about who writes programs for a living and for fun. When Evans Data (EDC) works with our clients, we are often helping them to understand how many professional developers there are in the world and how this number is growing. The research results are published in the EDC Global Developer Population and Demographic Study and also appear in EDC press releases, infographics and presentations:

 

EDC research shows that there are approximately 22 million professional developers in the world today. At this year’s Apple World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC 2017) Tim Cook announced that Apple has 16 million registered developers for their devices and platforms (up 3 million from the previous year).

 

What Developer Titles do you Track?

In a developer relations program, depending on your product, service, device, platform, framework or other offerings, you’ll reach out to a range of different types of developers. You will need to communicate and create content that speaks to the various different developers and expertise levels. Here are a few (of the many) ways to name someone that builds software for a company, for their customers and for themselves:

  • Professional Developer
  • Application Developer
  • Systems Developer
  • Full Stack Developer
  • Modern Developer
  • Programmer
  • Software Engineer
  • Hacker
  • Maker
  • Coder
  • Hobbyist
  • Situational Developer
  • Occupational Developer
  • Citizen Developer

 

What types of Developers does your Developer Relations Program speak To?

if your developer outreach program identifies additional developer personas, send me an email with the job titles that you reach out to.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://devnet.evansdata.org/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99

The Twelve C’s of Developer Relations (abridged version)

In everything that developer marketing, developer relations and developer advocacy team members do, it is good to remember the twelve C’s that are integral parts of a well oiled developer program and community. Here is a short hand version of my twelve C’s of Developer Relations. Later on, I’ll create a DevRelate white paper with a more in-depth coverage of each of the C’s.

The Twelve C’s (in no specific priority order except for the first 3)

  • Community – the main place where your development team, developer relations team and members will take part in your program, gain insights, solve problems, find answers and learn new tips, tricks and techniques.
  • Content – the videos, quick start guides, documentation, tutorials, white papers, blog posts and other valuable content.
  • Code – everyone will where most developers will spend a good portion of their time reading and writing programs. Developers love to write code, they also love to read it and share it with other developers.
  • Communication – developers like to talk to other developers. Developers also like to interact with the software engineers that create the tools, SDKs, APIs and content .
  • Collaboration – there are very few “lone” developers. Most developers work in teams, interact with other developers in their company, in their community and online in developer sites. Creating as many ways to foster collaboration by your team and your members is a sure sign of a vibrant and supportive community.
  • Contests – many developers like challenges. Some will enter programming contests and take part on hackathons. If you are creating online contests, make sure they run for a longer period of time that the typical weekend hackathon.
  • Champions – Look for the best of the best in your developer community. You’ll find them active in most aspects of your program and site. You can use gamification to identify top contributors and helpers. Give your champions a special
  • Conversations – make sure your developer program provides multiple ways for developers and your team to have conversations. These features can include forums/newsgroups, threaded conversations, posting comments on code,  content, bug reports, etc.
  • Cooperation – allow your partners and program members to help you by cooperating on bug triage, helping answer questions, participate in software testing, helping other developers with coding work, and more.
  • Contribution – allow your developer program members to contribute blog posts, add to your documentation wikis, input knowledge in the form of tips, tricks, techniques and lessons learned. If you have a bug reporting system (who doesn’t) allow community members to provide workarounds and source code fixes that work.
  • Certification – providing online and in person courses creates a more literate developer community. Providing an infrastructure for testing and certifying developers and the apps they build gives program members and their companies a higher status in your ecosystem. Some developer programs are also cooperating with local schools and online MOOCs to provide certificates of learning for technologies and your products, services, devices, APIs, tools, etc. The Google NanoDegree given by Udacity is one example of the modern way to train and certify developers. Most app stores also have test and certification systems for your apps.
  • Celebration – programming is fun (at least it is for me). Celebrating this unique form of creation and art should happen all the time in your developer program. Let your members vote for the apps, developers, MVPs, partners of the month and year (we see the same example in employee of the month/year in a lot of companies). Celebrate the release of a new product, a new partner integration, and a new capability. I even know a developer who told me that his company has “software and systems retirement” parties when they shut down and replace an application.

Do you have other C’s?

I’m sure you have additional C’s that you use and follow in your developer program and outreach. Here are a few additional C’s that I hear being used in presentations at the recent Evans Data Developer Marketing Summit: coolness, cognition, context, curiosity, culture, cohesiveness, completeness, capture, closed, and campaign.

 

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Developer Marketing and Developer Relations – Audiences, Metrics and ROI

As part of my August 2017 DevRelate webinar, “Developer Marketing & Developer Relations – Similarities & Differences“, August 8 & 10, I’ve put together additional background research and information about several high level aspects for each team member. In this blog post I am focusing on the audiences, metrics and ROI. Take a look at each of the aspects and let me know what you think about the details related to your own experiences and knowledge of industry experts you interact with.

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Audiences

What are the audiences that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members focus on? In creating the documents, messages, presentations and preparations for meetings, there are many audiences that will be targeted. In my years as a developer, manager, executive and advocate, I have talked to customers at all levels of their organization. I’ve given presentations to focused audiences and also larger diverse audiences. Here is a list of common audience members that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations members talk with, present to and write for.

  • C-Level
  • Division/Department Manager
  • Technical / Development Manager
  • Project Lead / Team Leader
  • Developer / Software Engineer
  • Software Architect
  • Researcher
  • Product/Marketing Manager
  • Business Development
  • ISV
  • OEM
  • Students
  • Hobbyist/Tinkerer/Maker
  • Thought Leaders
  • Authors
  • Editors

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Metrics and ROI

Measuring everything that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members do is key to constantly improving outreach, messaging, lead generation and enhancing a company’s top and bottom line. Some metrics and ROI measures are direct and straightforward. Other metrics and ROI measures are harder to directly attribute to specific events, content generated and interactions. Several sure ways to track more results is by coding everything via calls to actions at conferences, meetups, hackathons, meetings, presentations, panels, etc. Adding short URLs for follow up activities, codes to include in product orders, and spaces to tell everyone what why a developer made a decision, purchased a product, attended a follow on event will help add to your metrics and ROI calculations. Here are several metrics and ROI measures that Developer Marketing and Developer Relations team members should track.

  • Leads
  • Revenue (Direct/Indirect)
  • Developer Satisfaction
  • Net Promoter Score (NPS)
  • Market Share/Growth
  • Technology/Product Adoption
  • Product Quality/Improvements
  • Developer Retention/Renewals
  • Content Creation
  • Followers/Likes/Reposts/Retweets
  • Developer Credibility

 

Additional Webinar Information and Links

You can find additional links and information for the webinar at https://www.devrelate.com/devmktg-devrel-infolinks/.

 

How do you Measure Developer Marketing and Developer Relations activities, time spent, and budget spend?

Send me an email with additional metrics and ROI measures that you use to track your successes, improvements and things to fix. If you have additional developer focused audiences, pass them along as well.

David I Facebook Avatar

David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/