DRC 2017 recap: “Our Journey to a Growing Developer Program”, Susie Wee – Cisco

Susie Wee, VP and CTO of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems, gave a presentation at our recent 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference. The following is a recap of her session, “Our Journey to a Growing Developer Program”. [David I note: the graphics used in this blog post were not part of the presentation slide deck]

Susie started her session by asking the audience a few questions to understand who was attending and what they wanted to get out of her talk. A great way to start any presentation in order to make any “course corrections” to help the audience.

Cisco DevNet APIs

Susie mentioned that the Cisco DevNet developer network started about 3 years ago. Before that time Cisco had a series of APIs and SDKs for developers but no real developer program and community. What Cisco had was more of a partner community to resell Cisco products. Certifications were offered for the partners. You could ask a couple of questions about the early outreach to developers: why does Cisco have a developer program and isn’t Cisco a networking hardware company?

She explained that Cisco DevNet is a developer community and an innovation ecosystem. Technologies that are available to developers include: Internet of Things, Software Defined Networking, Cloud computing, Collaboration technologies (many developers will recognize Cisco Jabber), Security solutions, Data Center offerings, DevOps solutions, Services and Open Source.

As part of Susie’s talk and also the main focus on the upcoming DevNet Create Conference (May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco, CA), one of the main themes follows the sentence template of “Where Applications Meet xxx”. Developers who build applications should be able to easily fill in the “xxx” with some of the following: Infrastructure, Things (IoT), Places, People, Design, Architecture, Microservices, Deployment, Security, Analytics, etc. Between the apps that are developed there are interfaces to connect those apps to, well, everything! That is part of what Cisco provides beyond their traditional networking solutions.

Cisco DevNet Create

Susie explained how Cisco DevNet focuses on helping developers:

 

She mentioned that DevNet has more than 415,000 members, who work in more than 24,000 companies, provides 252 learning labs, provides 80 active APIs and more than 170 yearly developer outreach events.

Key to the success of Cisco DevNet are a laser focus on solving three key challenges: how to operate as a developer program, provide a clear value proposition for developers, and continue to grow a fiercely loyal developer community.

One of the stories that Susie mentioned was how DevNet attached itself onto the popular Cisco Live conferences that are help throughout the world. They put together all of their developer learning materials and created a DevNet zone on the side of the main conference. Attendees walked past the area and started telling their friends that there are cool learning labs over in this corner of the conference area. The buzz started to spread among attendees that there was a lab where you could develop software to integrate with Cisco technologies. John Chambers and his Cisco management team stopped by and saw what was happening in the DevNet theater and hands on lab. Now, at Cisco Live, the DevNet zone is the busiest section – Cool!

DevNet – 5 Lessons Learned

Susie shared the 5 lessons that they’ve learned during DevNet’s journey:

chalkboard-1927332_640

5) Operate like a startup and build up your developer credibility

4) Play to your strengths and build a technically talented “extended” team

3) Make your developer members heroes inside their companies and also in their communities

2) Help your team be wildly successful and ensure that your community has a heart

1) Innovate, Innovate, Innovate.

Innovate or Be Left Behind

bulb-40701_640 skull-476740_640

Developers have to solve big problems. A developer program’s mission is to help developers build innovative solutions for their companies and their customers. Your developer program has to continue to provide innovative features, content and tools that will help your developer members create innovative applications. Our industry moves forward, fast. Developers move forward, fast. If your developer program does not innovate to keep up with developer needs, your company and your developer program will be left in the dust.

Thank you, Susie Wee and Cisco, for being a part of our 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference.

Additional Information

Cisco DevNet  – https://developer.cisco.com/

DevNet Create Conference (May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco, CA)

Susie Wee’s session live stream replay is available on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ciscodevnet/videos/1962907540605184/

Session Title: DevNet: Fostering innovation where applications meet infrastructure

Session Description: How did a networking company start behaving like a software company and build a thriving developer community? How is DevNet achieving scale by engaging a broader internal and external community? The mission of Cisco DevNet is to provide developers with the tools, resources and code they need to create innovative, network-enabled solutions. But it’s more than just the technologies – DevNet is fostering innovation to help developers create seriously cool stuff. Join Susie Wee as she shares the successes, challenges and lessons learned in building a successful joint developer and innovation program, as well as what’s next for the DevNet community.

SusieWee

Susie Wee – VP and CTO of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems

 

Bio:

Susie is the Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems. She is the founder of DevNet, Cisco’s developer program for infrastructure and application developers, which catalyzes innovation by the developer ecosystem. DevNet covers the breadth of Cisco’s portfolio including networking, cloud, data center, security, collaboration and IoT. The innovations from DevNet improve end user experience, the operational experience and developer experience with the network. Under her leadership, the DevNet community has grown to over 400,000 developers in less than three years.

Prior to her current role, Susie was the Vice President and Chief Technology and Experience Officer of Cisco’s Collaboration Technology Group where she was responsible for driving innovation and experience design in Cisco’s collaboration products and software services, including unified communications, telepresence, web and video conferencing, and cloud collaboration. Before joining Cisco, Susie was the founding Vice President of Experience Software Business and CTO at Hewlett Packard, and Lab Director at HP Labs. Susie was the co-editor of the JPSEC standard for the security of JPEG-2000 images. She was formerly an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Circuits, Systems and Video Technology and IEEE Transactions on Image Processing. While at HP Labs, Susie was a consulting assistant professor at Stanford University where she co-taught a graduate-level course on digital video processing.

Susie received Technology Review’s Top 100 Young Innovators award, ComputerWorld’s Top 40 Innovators under 40 award, the Red Dot Design Concept award for augmented collaboration, the INCITs Technical Excellence award, the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame award, and was on the Forbes Most Powerful Women list. She is an IEEE Fellow for her contributions in multimedia technology and has over 50 international publications and 57 granted patents. Susie received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Less than Best Practices for Developer Marketing and Developer Relations

Next week, at the 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference (#DRC2017), I will be giving a talk titled “Assessing a Bad Developer Program and Prescribing Fixes to Rescue It”. DRC2017 takes place March 27 and 28 in Palo Alto California at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. In this session, I will take you on a tour of a bad developer outreach program. You’ll see some of the worst practices of developer marketing, developer relations, deliverables for developers, SDKs/APIs, content, social media, videos and more. I could take attendees on a tour of some of the worst examples of technology company developer programs, but I won’t. Instead, I have created a fictitious company, “Eureka Digital Works” that has a developer relations program that has some serious problems. Come to my session and see how I’ve prescribed the fixes to rescue it.

bad developer outreach

Examples of Bad Developer Outreach

Here are a few signs (in no particular order) that you might be part of a bad developer community and the outreach that should be avoided in your developer marketing, developer relations and developer community.

  • Too much sales and marketing in a technical newsletter
  • Ads in technical white papers, technical articles, uses cases, and developer blog posts
  • Developer outreach emails that contain more sales information and less technical information
  • Webinars that are advertised as “How To(s)” but contain mostly sales pitches
  • Quick Start Guides that contain too many pages and steps
  • How To articles that are more than 5 pages long
  • How To videos that are hours long
  • Developer Community site that is full of large sales and marketing ad banners
  • A Developer Conference that is more sales and marketing and less technical
  • Lack of developer tutorials on the developer community site
  • Missing or out of date documentation for APIs and SDKs
  • Unskilled, Untrained, non-engineer staff answering technical questions on a developer community forum
  • Lack of or slow response to critical bug reports
  • The developer feedback black hole – asking developers for suggestions, road map items, etc. but not accepting any of them
  • Lack of new, timely content, blog posts, events, videos, and other staples of a well run developer relations program

 

Developers and Developer Relations Professionals – send me your less than best practices examples

Calling all developers: if you have a list of things on your worst list for developer outreach, send me an email and I will add them to my list. Calling all developer relations professionals: if you have things you have tried that caused your developer community members to push back, send me an email and I will add them to my list.

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

 

Developer Program Buy In – Information and Links

The following are some information links for the March 14 and 16 DevRelate webinar, “Developer Program Buy In: How to get it, Keep it, and Measure Your Success“. This blog post will be updated with information throughout the week.

Developer Program Buy In

Evans Data Developer Marketing and Developer Program Research Reports

  • Developer Marketing Survey 2017 – A survey of software developers’ attitudes about the marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. Provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaign. This report is Essential for product promotions, pricing and forecasting, media planning, and all your developer marketing needs. For less than half the price of a single banner ad on most sites, this report will save you and your marketing budget money, time and effort on an exponential scale throughout the year. This is THE MOST important tool you can have for crafting an effective marketing campaign for developers. Report Length: 199 Pages
  • Developer Relations Survey 2016 – This comprehensive study of over 500 software developers examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program. Get answers to these questions and more in this survey report. Consider this a key resource to help you build and maintain a successful developer program, community website, and training sessions. Report Length: 129 Pages. [Note: 2017 report coming soon]

Developer Demographics 2017

Learn More at the Evans Data Developer Relations Conference and Boot Camp

To learn more about developer program buy-in, best practices, tips, and more you should attend the upcoming Evans Data Developer Relations Conference and Boot Camp. Both events take place in Palo Alto California at the Crowne Plaza Hotel.

 

Developer Program Buy In: Additional Information and Links

Take my 1 question Getting/Keeping Buy-In survey

Getting/Keeping Buy-In for your Developer Relations Program

        Top 6 buy-in pitch items (so far, as of this blog post writing):

        • Extend product/service into new markets, industries, and regions
        • Create products and supporting technologies that integrate and add value to product/service
        • Get feature requests, feedback on product/service, critical bugs found quickly into engineering
        • Early developer access will assist us in architecture and API choices
        • Developers trust other developers – not sales, marketing, business development
        • Have a set of demo apps to show at product, service and platform launches
        Other buy-in pitch items (so far, as of this blog post writing)

        • Build out a thriving and passionate global/local ecosystem/li>
        • Find future employee candidates for engineering, advocacy, product experts/li>
        • Help make the product/service ecosystem the choice of developers/li>
        • Developers listed to other developers and their recommendations, tips & tricks/li>
        • Create a showcase of apps, POCs, use cases, etc./li>
        • Create/Increase the marketing/brand buzz for new products/services/li>
        • Drive additional revenue/li>

 

Where does your Developer Relations Program report inside your Company? Choices can include:

      • CEO
      • Engineering
      • Marketing
      • Sales
      • Business Development
      • Product Management
      • Operations
      • Or maybe some other organization

Who are (or might) be your Stakeholders?

      • C-level – CEO, CTO, CDO, CMO, COO, CIO, CSO
      • Engineering – VP Development, Development Managers, Development Leads
      • Business Units – Product Manager, Product Marketing, Business Development
      • Marketing – Social, PR, Web, Digital Marketing
      • Sales/Operations – Global, Regional, Local, Partner/OEM

 

Getting, Keeping Buy-In by the developers in your Community

Thanks go out to Drew Schweinfurth at Walgreens for the items below.

  • CONSTANT COMMUNICATION!
  • Offer valuable Revenue Share/Affiliate Programs
  • Offer promotions to use your services
  • Offer marketing support and cross channel marketing support
  • Partnership is not a one-way street – services that they can offer to you!
  • Offer them beta or A/B testing on new services or updates
  • Let them meet the team and put faces to names.
  • Have them speak, mention them as a partner at events/conferences.

Do you have Additional Buy-In items and thoughts?

If you have additional Buy-In items that have worked for you and your developer relations program, please send me an email and I will add notes to this blog post.

 

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Getting/Keeping Buy-In for your Developer Relations Program

It used to be that only a very few specialized software companies cared at all about developers – and usually because they were selling programming tools or platforms.

Now every company needs to be connected and to work interactively with their clients, their partners, their suppliers, and their customers and to do that they publish APIs.  And if you publish APIs you, even if it’s just for your partners, you’ve got a platform.  And if you have a platform, you need developers to adopt it.

Who Needs a Developer Program?  Every company that wants to extend their reach, expand their brand and compete in a connected world.  It used to be that only technology companies cared about recruiting developers and cultivating a robust community.  Now companies in all industries have developer programs.

Five Common Objectives of a Developer Relations Program

There are five common objectives of a developer relations program:

  1. Adding value to your own products
  2. Growing your developer community
  3. Informing and supporting those who use your products or platform
  4. Building partnerships
  5. Growing your company ecosystem

Beyond these five, there are many additional aspects to consider in setting the goals and objectives for your developer program. Building out your list will help you get Buy-In from the stakeholders inside your organization. Depending on the size and age of your company, these stakeholders can include: executive management, business development, marketing, engineering, product management/marketing, operations, sales and support.

Please Take My 1 Question Survey

I am asking for your input as part of the development of a presentation. If you are preparing to pitch your developer program to stakeholders or if you remember what aspects you used when you pitched your existing program, I would appreciate if you could take my one question survey.

One question survey link: https://goo.gl/forms/epNrZdyLb1N3zQd63

survey-1594962_640

If you have any questions, additional comments, or need any other help, please send me an email.

Thank you in advance!

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

 

DRC2017 talk – DevRel Judo: Leveraging your company’s organizational structure …

Larry McDonough, Director of Product Management for the Developer Ecosystems at VMware, is giving a cool looking talk at the upcoming 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference (March 27 & 28) in Palo Alto California. The full title of Larry’s talk is “DevRel Judo:  Leveraging your company’s organizational structure to build a stronger Developer Relations team”. Larry has given talks at several of the past conferences and is an intelligent and engaging presenter.

DevRel Judo

DevRel Judo

Developer Relations is traditionally a centralized function, but what if you don’t have a dedicated DevRel team?  Can a decentralized DevRel team succeed? This presentation will highlight the dynamic and sometimes rocky journey that VMware has traveled regarding Developer Relations and the pros and cons of a decentralized structure.  I’ll talk about identifying and understanding developer personas, sharing standard developer relations functions across business units, managing resources and clarifying responsibilities, the importance of relationships with the product teams, and of course, constructing analytics to measure shared progress and success.  The purpose is to help you strengthen your DevRel teams by exploring your own company’s structure, it’s impact on your success and how you can leverage it’s strengths to improve developer outreach.

 

VMware Code

VMware {code} covered in this week’s “Learn the Secret Sauce of Developer Relations Programs” DevRelate Webinar

VMware’s developer program, VMware {code} was one of five spotlight programs that I covered in this week’s DevRelate webinar, “Learn the Secret Sauce of Developer Relations Programs“. I also had the opportunity to ask Larry a few questions about VMware’s developer program and developer outreach.

Here are my questions and Larry’s answers.

Q: What are the top three benefits to your company in having a developer relations program?

Good for Us: Health of our ecosystem. Our DevRel program, launched last year, is called “VMware {code}” and it’s main mission is to make sure developers new to our platform can easily get started, learn about our SDKs and APIs, and get connected with the larger VMware community.

Good for Customers: Adds value to our solutions. As a virtualization platform company, we can’t be experts in every vertical market segment. For areas where there are gaps in our solution coverage, or that require specialized vertical segment expertise (like disaster recovery, security and anti-virus, etc.) our partners have opportunities to complete the solution story for customers.

Good for Developers: On-ramp to “Partner” status. Partner engagements at VMware are taken very seriously, and it’s a big leap from a member of a free developer program to our TAP (Technology Alliance Partner) program levels. TAP Access is $750/yr and TAP Elite is $7,500/yr. These programs provide a lot of business value to partners by enabling special integrations, technical support, and customer leads.

Q. Where does the VMware developer relations team/program live inside the company’s organization?

It’s distributed; but there’s a central organization called “ROCS” for R&D Operations and Central Services that’s responsible for hosting and managing all the centralized developer and partner infrastructure that’s used by all the other groups. This is the group where I work. We manage our developer/partner portal, developer and partner programs, partner product certifications, compatibility guide, and coming soon, a centralized marketplace micro-service. Business units are responsible for keeping their developer content up to date on the developer portal. All Developer Marketing, Events, Newsletters, blogs, Slack and social networking is handled out of Digital Marketing. And lastly, all partner go-to-market (non-technical) engagement is handled out of our Partner Alliances team.

Q. How many applications have been created using the VMware SDKs/APIs?

The number of apps is very hard to measure. We have over 100k SDKs downloaded per year and a lot of development is for on-prem purposes. Our Office of the CTO has a site they call “Flings” where a lot of really cool apps are highlighted: https://labs.vmware.com/flings/ It’s not part of VMware {code}, and it’s all built by VMware engineers. But they’re very popular and I’m exploring how to integrate these with VMware {code}

Q. I noticed that the VMware Developer Center and VMware Code are now one and the same. What were some of the reasons for combining them together?

Great question! The main driver is to centralize developer outreach infrastructure. The previous VMware {code} site was a simple WordPress site maintained by our Digital Marketing team. They are really good at community building and hosting events, but they didn’t have any core developer goodies to offer like SDKs, API explorer, Sample exchange to name a few. Developer Center had those, but no market resources to get the word out, organize events, and build community. It just made sense to merge. This has been a goal of mine for 2 years. Together, we’ve now get the strength/weight to strongly encourage the Business Units to build their developer outreach on us and not recreate their own thing. This is where all the micro-site work comes in this year.

Q. Are there any other key performance indicators statistics that you track and provide to VMware management to keep them informed and supporting how the developer program is doing?

Our big focus this year will be member registration and developer engagement. I’ll be tracking how these track to our social media efforts and actual events. Of course, we track closely SDK downloads and community engagement as well.

Q. Is there anything else that you’d like to add about the VMware program its uniqueness and where do you see developer relations and developer outreach going in the future?

We’re going to continue to invest in the DevOps area since that’s a big ecosystem surrounding our products. We’re also going to be encouraging a lot more open source engagement.

 

DevRel Judo

Larry McDonough Bio

Larry McDonough is the Director of Product Management for the Developer Ecosystems at VMware. He has previously presented on his work in numerous topics affecting developers including Developer Relations & DevOps, Developer Evangelism, Home Automation/IoT, Mobile App Security, and Android Development. Larry has a BS in Computer Science from University of California Riverside and an MBA from UCLA’s Anderson Graduate School of Management.

Follow VMware {code} on Twitter

 

13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference

To see Larry’s talk, six keynotes, additional sessions and network with developer relations program managers and experts, register for the 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference taking place in Palo Alto, March 27-28, 2017 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. You can find the full conference schedule with information about all of the keynotes, sessions, speakers and the all day Sunday DevRel Boot Camp (March 26, 2017) on the conference website at https://evansdata.com/drc/.

Register for the Conference

As a thank you for reading the DevRelate blog, use code DRCSocial17 to save $100 off your conference pass!

 

Template Letter Requesting Approval to Attend a Developer Conference

Conferences are, and have always been, a mainstay of developer outreach and marketing. Developers like conferences, especially those with a lot of meaty technical sessions by the engineers that build the technology. Key benefits for attending developer conferences include the technical sessions by developers who know great tips and techniques. Developers attending conferences also mention the social aspects of a conference: the networking, social interaction, and discussion with other developers. Sometimes developers need to send their manager a “Conference Approval Letter”.

Most conferences are put on by vendors and concentrate on that vendor’s technology, platform, service, device, etc. You might think that conferences would only be put on by very large companies with breadth and depth to provide a full schedule of keynotes and sessions. Smaller companies might put on conferences that are shorter and with less sessions. Some companies will partner with a non-competing company to put on a conference. Other companies will piggy-back a conference on a larger industry event. In any case, developers attend conferences, and most attend more than two per year.

One of the conference to-do items that I’ve used in the past is to provide potential attendees with a template letter they can customize to convince their manager to allow them to attend the conference. The letter includes information about the event, what attendees will learn, what best practices and ideas will be brought back, what contacts will be made, and how attending will help their company, employees, products and customers.

As an example of what a request to attend a conference template letter might look like, I have created a sample email/letter/memo for our upcoming 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference.

Conference Approval Letter

Template Email/Letter/Memo Requesting Approval to Attend a Conference

 

Here is a draft email/letter/memo you can use to request approval to attend the 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference, March 27 & 28, 2017 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto, California

Subject: Request for Authorization to attend the 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference

I would like your approval for me to attend the 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference, March 27 & 28, 2017 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto, California. The conference features two days of keynotes and sessions by leading executives and directors of Developer Relations and Advocacy programs for top technology companies in the world. This is a conference unlike any other, developer relations experts from leading companies in the software, telecom and web markets will come together to discuss best practices and reveal the techniques behind their success!

At the conference I will learn developer outreach best practices, tips & advice, and other aspects of running a world class developer relations program from the business side (program ROI, the connection between developer programs and company revenue, budgeting for/costs of developer programs, how to get an organization’s commitment of internal resources, etc.) to the marketing side (techniques for recruitment, awareness tactics, community loyalty building programs, legal/privacy and global privacy considerations, conducting a privacy audit, internationalizing a US-based developer program, etc.), and much more.

During the conference I will have ample opportunity to network with top developer relations program managers, ask specific questions that can help our developer outreach plans and learn “The Art of Evangelism” from Guy Kawasaki, the chief evangelist of Canva, board of trustees member of the Wikimedia Foundation, a brand ambassador for Mercedes Benz USA, executive fellow of the Haas School of Business (UC Berkeley) and former chief evangelist of Apple.

Who will be attend:

  • VPs, CTOs, and CEOs
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Technology & Developer Evangelists
  • Products Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing

 

If you approve my attendance before December 31, 2016 I can take advantage of the super early bird pricing and save our company $400. If you approve before January 31, 2017 I can save $300 on the full conference price of $1295.

Thank you in advance for considering this opportunity for me to attend this unique conference. Please let me know if you need additional information about the conference. You can find additional information, conference schedule, speaker list and companies planning to attend on the conference web site at https://evansdata.com/drc/2017/

I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

PS: There is also a pre-conference Developer Relations Boot Camp that can additionally prepare me for the two day conference. The Evans Data Corporation’s Developer Relations Boot Camp provides a solid foundation on which I can build or enhance our developer program. Concentrated sessions in this one-day instructional program provide the insight and actionable information I can use to build our brand and establish strong relationships with our developer community.

The combination of an experienced boot camp faculty and Evans Data developer research will guide:

  • Careful consideration regarding the reasons why developers seek out and participate in developer programs
  • The most effective means of reaching out to them
  • How you can leverage social media to greatest effect.

 

At the end of the day I will leave with a certificate of completion as well as the knowledge and confidence to create, enhance and run a world class developer program.

 

Other “need to convince your boss?” example conference template letters

Here are a few additional examples of template letters that conferences have provided for their target attendees.

 

Do you have developer conference manager approval template letters?

If you have your own template manager approval letters that you provide to your program members, send me an email with the link or text.

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/