DevRelate Webinar Nov 16 & 28 : Developer Relations Best Practices (Part 2)

Back in January 2017 we presented the first in a series of Developer Relations Best Practices, “Developer Relations Best Practices and Tools of the Trade“, focused on several aspects you’ll find in a well run developer outreach program. In that webinar we covered seven developer program best practices including: Social Media, Blogs, Newsletters, Webinars, Videos, Documentation and Answers.

In Part 2 of the Developer Relations Best Practices webinar series we’ll cover: events & activities, API sandboxes & virtual labs, app stores & application showcases, community chat systems, training & certification, popular blogging topics, and the programming languages you should support.

The developer relations best practices webinar content is supported by Evans Data Tactical Developer Marketing (Developer Marketing 2017 Survey and Developer Relations 2017 Survey) research results.

Agenda

1) Reasons for Joining and Staying in a Developer Program
2) Developer Relations Best Practices Part 2
3) Q&A

Dates and Times

This webinar is offered multiple times on Tuesday, November 16th and Tuesday, November 28th. Select the date and time that works best for you. Use the pull down date/time box on the GoToWebinar registration page to select the session you want to attend. Register here!

Thursday (November 16, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 1pm Pacific Standard Time (3pm CST, 4pm EST, 9PM GMT, 10pm CET)
  • 5pm Pacific Standard Time (9am CST Beijing November 17, 12noon AEDT Sydney November 17)

Tuesday (November 28, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 10am Pacific Standard Time (12pm CST, 1pm EST, 6pm GMT, 7pm CET)

 

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Evangelists
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

The insights provided in this webinar stem from years of experience and the direct input from a global panel of software developers about what works for them and what doesn’t.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or enhancing a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get! Register Now!

 

Developer Community Answers Software (Commercial, SaaS, Open Source)

One of the most popular developer answers sites in Stack Overflow (SO). SO is so popular that some developer programs use it for their support and answer site by incorporating specific tags for their company, developer program and products. Did you know that there are answer software solutions available that you can integrate into your community site? Here are just a few of the many commercial and free answer software systems.

Commercial Answers Software

Commercial Online Answers Sites

  • AllAnswered – https://www.allanswered.com/
  • Askbot – https://askbot.com/
  • Haydle Enterprise Q&A – http://haydle.com/
  • Questions for Confluence – https://www.atlassian.com/software/confluence/questions

Free/open Source Answers Software

  • Biostar – https://github.com/ialbert/biostar-central
  • OSQA – http://www.osqa.net/
  • PaizaQA – https://github.com/gi-no/paizaqa
  • QAror – https://github.com/mateuszdw/qaror/
  • Question2Answer – http://www.question2answer.org

Do you use other Question/Answer software?

Send me an email if you use other commercial, online or open source question/answer software systems.

 

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Benefits of Joining and Staying in a Developer Program

More than 80 percent of developers tell Evans Data, in the Developer Relations Program Survey 2017, that they belong to one or more developer programs (free and/or paid). A majority of developers have consistently told Evans Data that they won’t use a product, service, platform, API, device, framework, library and other technologies if there isn’t an associated active developer community. The top reasons for joining and staying with a technology and a developer community are included in “The Four T’s”: technical support, technical information, training and tools. Being a part of a thriving developer community, developers tell Evans Data that there are three primary benefits that they report to their executives and managers: time saved, increased productivity and improved quality.

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Time Saved

When your developer program provides great documentation, getting started guides, step by step tutorials, sample template projects, pre-built client and server libraries, videos, and code snippets programmers can save time learning your APIs, building applications and reusing code. In the Evans Data Developer Relations Survey 2017,  more than three quarters of developers report that they save time because of their membership. The savings amount to being able to get more work done each week. Being able to access latest updates, bug fixes, and workarounds allows developers to avoid wasting time trying to track down a known problem. Talking with other developers in program forums and newsgroups can also save hours of wasted time that others have already incurred.

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Increased Productivity

Using great tools, SDKs and content helps developers streamline their design, development, testing and deployment work. Leveraging the work done by your R&D team and developer advocates to help community members results in increased productivity for themselves and their teams. In my years of experience and with feedback from community members, it always helps to have someone show you the best practices and how to(s) for a technology allowing you to focus on what makes your solution unique to your company’s business. Copying sample code and reusing libraries and frameworks also saves time that can be used to work on other development projects.

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Improved Quality

One of the best measures of developer program membership, according to developers in the recent Evans Data Developer Relations Program survey, is the improvement in the quality of their code. We know that developers write code. At the same time, developers also read code. Being a part of a developer program allows developers to avoid worst practices, talk with other developers about how to performance tune code, find and create workarounds for issues, write unit and system tests, use audits and metrics tools to identify code smells, and more. Hearing about development problems and solutions from other developers in community forums, in articles and on webinars helps another developer avoid the same problems, traps and pitfalls. Being able to access a bug tracking database on  a developer program site will lead to better quality products being built by your customers and your own R&D teams.

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Additional Benefits Heard from your Community Members?

Do you have additional developer benefits that you’ve heard from your developer community members? Send me an email with your list.

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

 

Webinar – June 20 & 22, 2017: Know your Developers and Creating Personas

The value of segmenting your target audience is well known to marketers across industries. Populations don’t exist as a homogeneous group but always have variations that color their perceptions and their adoption of product offerings. The same is true for developers.

Software developers can be divided in segments based on many factors. These might include technologies they use, where they work, what gets their synapses firing, what programming languages they use, what motivates them, etc. Once developer segments are defined, you can start organizing your existing developer community and attracting additional developers to your developer program.

Creating developer personas is one of the first steps to applying more modern developer marketing techniques in a technology world that is more and more individualized. This DevRelate webinar will introduce you to different types of developers.developer-personas-webinar

Agenda

  1. Developers Wear several hats
  2. Large and small companies/teams
  3. Today’s developer
  4. Platforms, languages, frameworks, tools
  5. Membership and success
  6. Motivations, aspirations, worries and fears
  7. First steps to creating developer personas
  8. Q&A

Dates/Times

Note: This webinar is offered several times. Select the date and time that works best for you using the drop down list on the GoToWebinar registration form. You can also see the webinar times shown in your time zone on the GoToWebinar registration form.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

  • 7am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 9am CDT (Chicago) | 10am EDT (New York) | 2pm GMT | 3pm BST (London) | 4pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 10am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 12noon CDT (Chicago) | 1pm EDT (New York) | 5pm GMT | 6pm BST (London) | 7pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 5pm PDT (Santa Cruz) | 8am CST (Beijing Wednesday, June 21) | 10am AEST (Sydney Wednesday June 21)

Thursday, June 22, 2017

  • 7am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 9am CDT (Chicago) | 10am EDT (New York) | 2pm GMT | 3pm BST (London) | 4pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 1pm PDT (Santa Cruz) | 2pm CDT (Chicago) | 3pm EDT (New York)

 

Register Now to Reserve your Seat: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/3599119755299893761

 

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Evangelists
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

 

Register Now

 

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

David I Facebook Avatar

DRC 2017 recap: “Our Journey to a Growing Developer Program”, Susie Wee – Cisco

Susie Wee, VP and CTO of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems, gave a presentation at our recent 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference. The following is a recap of her session, “Our Journey to a Growing Developer Program”. [David I note: the graphics used in this blog post were not part of the presentation slide deck]

Susie started her session by asking the audience a few questions to understand who was attending and what they wanted to get out of her talk. A great way to start any presentation in order to make any “course corrections” to help the audience.

Cisco DevNet APIs

Susie mentioned that the Cisco DevNet developer network started about 3 years ago. Before that time Cisco had a series of APIs and SDKs for developers but no real developer program and community. What Cisco had was more of a partner community to resell Cisco products. Certifications were offered for the partners. You could ask a couple of questions about the early outreach to developers: why does Cisco have a developer program and isn’t Cisco a networking hardware company?

She explained that Cisco DevNet is a developer community and an innovation ecosystem. Technologies that are available to developers include: Internet of Things, Software Defined Networking, Cloud computing, Collaboration technologies (many developers will recognize Cisco Jabber), Security solutions, Data Center offerings, DevOps solutions, Services and Open Source.

As part of Susie’s talk and also the main focus on the upcoming DevNet Create Conference (May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco, CA), one of the main themes follows the sentence template of “Where Applications Meet xxx”. Developers who build applications should be able to easily fill in the “xxx” with some of the following: Infrastructure, Things (IoT), Places, People, Design, Architecture, Microservices, Deployment, Security, Analytics, etc. Between the apps that are developed there are interfaces to connect those apps to, well, everything! That is part of what Cisco provides beyond their traditional networking solutions.

Cisco DevNet Create

Susie explained how Cisco DevNet focuses on helping developers:

 

She mentioned that DevNet has more than 415,000 members, who work in more than 24,000 companies, provides 252 learning labs, provides 80 active APIs and more than 170 yearly developer outreach events.

Key to the success of Cisco DevNet are a laser focus on solving three key challenges: how to operate as a developer program, provide a clear value proposition for developers, and continue to grow a fiercely loyal developer community.

One of the stories that Susie mentioned was how DevNet attached itself onto the popular Cisco Live conferences that are help throughout the world. They put together all of their developer learning materials and created a DevNet zone on the side of the main conference. Attendees walked past the area and started telling their friends that there are cool learning labs over in this corner of the conference area. The buzz started to spread among attendees that there was a lab where you could develop software to integrate with Cisco technologies. John Chambers and his Cisco management team stopped by and saw what was happening in the DevNet theater and hands on lab. Now, at Cisco Live, the DevNet zone is the busiest section – Cool!

DevNet – 5 Lessons Learned

Susie shared the 5 lessons that they’ve learned during DevNet’s journey:

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5) Operate like a startup and build up your developer credibility

4) Play to your strengths and build a technically talented “extended” team

3) Make your developer members heroes inside their companies and also in their communities

2) Help your team be wildly successful and ensure that your community has a heart

1) Innovate, Innovate, Innovate.

Innovate or Be Left Behind

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Developers have to solve big problems. A developer program’s mission is to help developers build innovative solutions for their companies and their customers. Your developer program has to continue to provide innovative features, content and tools that will help your developer members create innovative applications. Our industry moves forward, fast. Developers move forward, fast. If your developer program does not innovate to keep up with developer needs, your company and your developer program will be left in the dust.

Thank you, Susie Wee and Cisco, for being a part of our 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference.

Additional Information

Cisco DevNet  – https://developer.cisco.com/

DevNet Create Conference (May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco, CA)

Susie Wee’s session live stream replay is available on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ciscodevnet/videos/1962907540605184/

Session Title: DevNet: Fostering innovation where applications meet infrastructure

Session Description: How did a networking company start behaving like a software company and build a thriving developer community? How is DevNet achieving scale by engaging a broader internal and external community? The mission of Cisco DevNet is to provide developers with the tools, resources and code they need to create innovative, network-enabled solutions. But it’s more than just the technologies – DevNet is fostering innovation to help developers create seriously cool stuff. Join Susie Wee as she shares the successes, challenges and lessons learned in building a successful joint developer and innovation program, as well as what’s next for the DevNet community.

SusieWee

Susie Wee – VP and CTO of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems

 

Bio:

Susie is the Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of DevNet Innovations at Cisco Systems. She is the founder of DevNet, Cisco’s developer program for infrastructure and application developers, which catalyzes innovation by the developer ecosystem. DevNet covers the breadth of Cisco’s portfolio including networking, cloud, data center, security, collaboration and IoT. The innovations from DevNet improve end user experience, the operational experience and developer experience with the network. Under her leadership, the DevNet community has grown to over 400,000 developers in less than three years.

Prior to her current role, Susie was the Vice President and Chief Technology and Experience Officer of Cisco’s Collaboration Technology Group where she was responsible for driving innovation and experience design in Cisco’s collaboration products and software services, including unified communications, telepresence, web and video conferencing, and cloud collaboration. Before joining Cisco, Susie was the founding Vice President of Experience Software Business and CTO at Hewlett Packard, and Lab Director at HP Labs. Susie was the co-editor of the JPSEC standard for the security of JPEG-2000 images. She was formerly an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Circuits, Systems and Video Technology and IEEE Transactions on Image Processing. While at HP Labs, Susie was a consulting assistant professor at Stanford University where she co-taught a graduate-level course on digital video processing.

Susie received Technology Review’s Top 100 Young Innovators award, ComputerWorld’s Top 40 Innovators under 40 award, the Red Dot Design Concept award for augmented collaboration, the INCITs Technical Excellence award, the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame award, and was on the Forbes Most Powerful Women list. She is an IEEE Fellow for her contributions in multimedia technology and has over 50 international publications and 57 granted patents. Susie received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Less than Best Practices for Developer Marketing and Developer Relations

Next week, at the 13th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference (#DRC2017), I will be giving a talk titled “Assessing a Bad Developer Program and Prescribing Fixes to Rescue It”. DRC2017 takes place March 27 and 28 in Palo Alto California at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. In this session, I will take you on a tour of a bad developer outreach program. You’ll see some of the worst practices of developer marketing, developer relations, deliverables for developers, SDKs/APIs, content, social media, videos and more. I could take attendees on a tour of some of the worst examples of technology company developer programs, but I won’t. Instead, I have created a fictitious company, “Eureka Digital Works” that has a developer relations program that has some serious problems. Come to my session and see how I’ve prescribed the fixes to rescue it.

bad developer outreach

Examples of Bad Developer Outreach

Here are a few signs (in no particular order) that you might be part of a bad developer community and the outreach that should be avoided in your developer marketing, developer relations and developer community.

  • Too much sales and marketing in a technical newsletter
  • Ads in technical white papers, technical articles, uses cases, and developer blog posts
  • Developer outreach emails that contain more sales information and less technical information
  • Webinars that are advertised as “How To(s)” but contain mostly sales pitches
  • Quick Start Guides that contain too many pages and steps
  • How To articles that are more than 5 pages long
  • How To videos that are hours long
  • Developer Community site that is full of large sales and marketing ad banners
  • A Developer Conference that is more sales and marketing and less technical
  • Lack of developer tutorials on the developer community site
  • Missing or out of date documentation for APIs and SDKs
  • Unskilled, Untrained, non-engineer staff answering technical questions on a developer community forum
  • Lack of or slow response to critical bug reports
  • The developer feedback black hole – asking developers for suggestions, road map items, etc. but not accepting any of them
  • Lack of new, timely content, blog posts, events, videos, and other staples of a well run developer relations program

 

Developers and Developer Relations Professionals – send me your less than best practices examples

Calling all developers: if you have a list of things on your worst list for developer outreach, send me an email and I will add them to my list. Calling all developer relations professionals: if you have things you have tried that caused your developer community members to push back, send me an email and I will add them to my list.

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/