Developer Relations “Fireside Chat” with Guy Kawasaki and David I. – Tuesday March 27, 2018

At the upcoming 14th Annual Evans Data Developer Relations Conference (DRC2018), Guy Kawasaki will participate in a “Fireside Chat” with David Intersimone “David I”. During the keynote, David I will ask Guy Kawasaki a series of questions covering developer relations best practice and experiences. They’ll also take questions from conference attendees. This keynote session will take place on Tuesday, March 27 at 11:15am at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California.

Guy Kawasaki was chief evangelist of Apple and David was chief evangelist for Borland/Embarcadero Technologies’ Developer Tools Group.

About Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. He is on the board of trustees of the Wikimedia Foundation, a brand ambassador for Mercedes Benz USA, and an executive fellow of the Haas School of Business (UC Berkeley). He was also the chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of the Start 2.0, The Art of Social Media, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

Guy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GuyKawasaki

Guy on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/

Guy’s Website: https://guykawasaki.com/

 

About David Intersimone “David I”

David Intersimone, known to many as David I, is a passionate and innovative software industry veteran who extols and educates the world on developer tools, software development and software architectures. David I joined Borland Software in 1985 where he practically invented Developer Relations. During David I’s forty-three years as a developer, development manager, developer community executive and chief evangelist, he has created a thriving global developer community, thousands of articles, videos and blog posts.

Before Embarcadero acquired the developer tools business from Borland Software, David spent more than 20 years with Borland in various evangelism, engineering, and development capacities, including creating the company’s developer relations program.

Today, David I shares his visions and insights as a pioneer in developer relations with program managers and directors through Evans Data’s Developer Program Advisory where he gives workshops, guidance and advice on program creation and enhancement and through the DevRelate Developer Program community website.

David I on Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidi99

David I on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

David I’s DevRelate blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/

 

Join us at the Evans Data 14th Annual Developer Relations Conference

The conference takes place on March 26 and 27, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto California. There is also a Sunday, March 25 Developer Relations Bootcamp strategic workshop that provides a solid foundation on which you can build or enhance your developer program. Concentrated sessions in this one-day instructional program provide the insight and actionable information you can use to build your brand and establish strong relationships with your developer community.

During the two day conference the keynotes, sessions and workshops will cover all aspects of developer relations, ranging from the business side (program ROI, the connection between developer programs and company revenue, budgeting for/costs of developer programs, how to get an organization’s commitment of internal resources, etc.) to the marketing side (techniques for recruitment, awareness tactics, community loyalty building programs, legal/privacy and global privacy considerations, conducting a privacy audit, internationalizing a US-based developer program, etc), and much more.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or building on a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get – and this is the place to get it!

In an event unlike any other, developer relations experts from leading companies in the software, telecom and web markets will come together to discuss best practices and reveal the techniques behind their success!

You’ll find additional Developer Relations Conference information, keynote presenters, speakers and conference schedule on the DRC2018 Web Site.

 

10 Step Event/Webinar Process to Purchase

When you are preparing for an event, meetup, webinar or other activity and you want to build an effective outreach to developers in your community, you can follow 10 steps to create interest, start the engagement, lead your members to prepare and participate, and create a catalog of digital assets that you can use to drive their journey to purchase.

  1. Create a blog/news item on a technical topic to start your developer member’s interest and engender engagement.
  2. Create the Event/Webinar – invite developers.
  3. Create 2-3 short teaser videos (like you see for movies that have “trailer” and “teaser” clips to drive interest and social buzz) and post these to developer social media portals.
  4. Hire a subject matter expert/author to create an Independent Expert White Paper (20-60 pages depending on the complexity of the architecture and technology) with supporting information for the topic area.
  5. Encourage developers to download the available materials in advance of the event/webinar to prepare for and follow along with the presentation.
  6. Run the Event/Webinar in multiple locations / time zones. Remember that developers have different schedules and are located in different countries.
  7. Package the slides, demos, and notes for reuse by team members, partners, and other leaders in your community.
  8. Create a landing page with all of the videos, code/project samples and demos, slides, technical paper, and additional info/links
  9. Email all of the attendees/no shows and other community members with links to the landing page. Track their progress in using the materials with tracking links.
  10. Nurture all of those interested in the topic with additional information and offers based on their individual path(s) along the journey.

Creating all of these reusable assets and collecting them together into landing pages and placing them in an easy to find catalog on your developer community site will allow members to quickly follow a learning path and enter at a point in their development journey based on their interest area and technical level.

This 10 step process was covered in the recent DevRelate Webinar, “Effectively Communicating with Developers“. Additional information about this webinar is available on the webinar’s information links page and on the webinar replay page (DevRelate memberships required).

 

 

DevRelate Webinar Nov 16 & 28 : Developer Relations Best Practices (Part 2)

Back in January 2017 we presented the first in a series of Developer Relations Best Practices, “Developer Relations Best Practices and Tools of the Trade“, focused on several aspects you’ll find in a well run developer outreach program. In that webinar we covered seven developer program best practices including: Social Media, Blogs, Newsletters, Webinars, Videos, Documentation and Answers.

In Part 2 of the Developer Relations Best Practices webinar series we’ll cover: events & activities, API sandboxes & virtual labs, app stores & application showcases, community chat systems, training & certification, popular blogging topics, and the programming languages you should support.

The developer relations best practices webinar content is supported by Evans Data Tactical Developer Marketing (Developer Marketing 2017 Survey and Developer Relations 2017 Survey) research results.

Agenda

1) Reasons for Joining and Staying in a Developer Program
2) Developer Relations Best Practices Part 2
3) Q&A

Dates and Times

This webinar is offered multiple times on Tuesday, November 16th and Tuesday, November 28th. Select the date and time that works best for you. Use the pull down date/time box on the GoToWebinar registration page to select the session you want to attend. Register here!

Thursday (November 16, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 1pm Pacific Standard Time (3pm CST, 4pm EST, 9PM GMT, 10pm CET)
  • 5pm Pacific Standard Time (9am CST Beijing November 17, 12noon AEDT Sydney November 17)

Tuesday (November 28, 2017)

  • 7am Pacific Standard Time (9am CST, 10am EST, 3pm GMT, 4pm CET)
  • 10am Pacific Standard Time (12pm CST, 1pm EST, 6pm GMT, 7pm CET)

 

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Evangelists
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

The insights provided in this webinar stem from years of experience and the direct input from a global panel of software developers about what works for them and what doesn’t.

Whether you are starting a new developer relations program or enhancing a current one, you deserve all of the help you can get! Register Now!

 

The Twelve C’s – Webinar Information and Links

During the week of the October 2017 DevRelate webinar series, additional information and links will appear on this page. Bookmark this page and come back as the webinars take place.

Evans Data Tactical Marketing Reports

Evans Data reaches out to its global developer panel to produce two annual tactical marketing reports: Developer Marketing Survey Report and Developer Relations Survey Report. The Developer Marketing Survey contains software developers’ attitudes about marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaigns. The Developer Relations Survey examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program and advocacy.

 

The Twelve C’s (in no specific priority order except for the first 3)

  • Community – the main place where your development team, developer relations team and members will take part in your program, gain insights, solve problems, find answers and learn new tips, tricks and techniques.
  • Content – the videos, quick start guides, documentation, tutorials, white papers, blog posts and other valuable content.
  • Code – everyone will where most developers will spend a good portion of their time reading and writing programs. Developers love to write code, they also love to read it and share it with other developers.
  • Communication – developers like to talk to other developers. Developers also like to interact with the software engineers that create the tools, SDKs, APIs and content .
  • Collaboration – there are very few “lone” developers. Most developers work in teams, interact with other developers in their company, in their community and online in developer sites. Creating as many ways to foster collaboration by your team and your members is a sure sign of a vibrant and supportive community.
  • Contests – many developers like challenges. Some will enter programming contests and take part on hackathons. If you are creating online contests, make sure they run for a longer period of time that the typical weekend hackathon.
  • Champions – Look for the best of the best in your developer community. You’ll find them active in most aspects of your program and site. You can use gamification to identify top contributors and helpers. Give your champions a special
  • Conversations – make sure your developer program provides multiple ways for developers and your team to have conversations. These features can include forums/newsgroups, threaded conversations, posting comments on code,  content, bug reports, etc.
  • Cooperation – allow your partners and program members to help you by cooperating on bug triage, helping answer questions, participate in software testing, helping other developers with coding work, and more.
  • Contribution – allow your developer program members to contribute blog posts, add to your documentation wikis, input knowledge in the form of tips, tricks, techniques and lessons learned. If you have a bug reporting system (who doesn’t) allow community members to provide workarounds and source code fixes that work.
  • Certification – providing online and in person courses creates a more literate developer community. Providing an infrastructure for testing and certifying developers and the apps they build gives program members and their companies a higher status in your ecosystem. Some developer programs are also cooperating with local schools and online MOOCs to provide certificates of learning for technologies and your products, services, devices, APIs, tools, etc. The Google NanoDegree given by Udacity is one example of the modern way to train and certify developers. Most app stores also have test and certification systems for your apps.
  • Celebration – programming is fun (at least it is for me). Celebrating this unique form of creation and art should happen all the time in your developer program. Let your members vote for the apps, developers, MVPs, partners of the month and year (we see the same example in employee of the month/year in a lot of companies). Celebrate the release of a new product, a new partner integration, and a new capability. I even know a developer who told me that his company has “software and systems retirement” parties when they shut down and replace an application.

The Twelve C’s of Developer Relations (abridged version)

In everything that developer marketing, developer relations and developer advocacy team members do, it is good to remember the twelve C’s that are integral parts of a well oiled developer program and community. Here is a short hand version of my twelve C’s of Developer Relations. Later on, I’ll create a DevRelate white paper with a more in-depth coverage of each of the C’s.

The Twelve C’s (in no specific priority order except for the first 3)

  • Community – the main place where your development team, developer relations team and members will take part in your program, gain insights, solve problems, find answers and learn new tips, tricks and techniques.
  • Content – the videos, quick start guides, documentation, tutorials, white papers, blog posts and other valuable content.
  • Code – everyone will where most developers will spend a good portion of their time reading and writing programs. Developers love to write code, they also love to read it and share it with other developers.
  • Communication – developers like to talk to other developers. Developers also like to interact with the software engineers that create the tools, SDKs, APIs and content .
  • Collaboration – there are very few “lone” developers. Most developers work in teams, interact with other developers in their company, in their community and online in developer sites. Creating as many ways to foster collaboration by your team and your members is a sure sign of a vibrant and supportive community.
  • Contests – many developers like challenges. Some will enter programming contests and take part on hackathons. If you are creating online contests, make sure they run for a longer period of time that the typical weekend hackathon.
  • Champions – Look for the best of the best in your developer community. You’ll find them active in most aspects of your program and site. You can use gamification to identify top contributors and helpers. Give your champions a special
  • Conversations – make sure your developer program provides multiple ways for developers and your team to have conversations. These features can include forums/newsgroups, threaded conversations, posting comments on code,  content, bug reports, etc.
  • Cooperation – allow your partners and program members to help you by cooperating on bug triage, helping answer questions, participate in software testing, helping other developers with coding work, and more.
  • Contribution – allow your developer program members to contribute blog posts, add to your documentation wikis, input knowledge in the form of tips, tricks, techniques and lessons learned. If you have a bug reporting system (who doesn’t) allow community members to provide workarounds and source code fixes that work.
  • Certification – providing online and in person courses creates a more literate developer community. Providing an infrastructure for testing and certifying developers and the apps they build gives program members and their companies a higher status in your ecosystem. Some developer programs are also cooperating with local schools and online MOOCs to provide certificates of learning for technologies and your products, services, devices, APIs, tools, etc. The Google NanoDegree given by Udacity is one example of the modern way to train and certify developers. Most app stores also have test and certification systems for your apps.
  • Celebration – programming is fun (at least it is for me). Celebrating this unique form of creation and art should happen all the time in your developer program. Let your members vote for the apps, developers, MVPs, partners of the month and year (we see the same example in employee of the month/year in a lot of companies). Celebrate the release of a new product, a new partner integration, and a new capability. I even know a developer who told me that his company has “software and systems retirement” parties when they shut down and replace an application.

Do you have other C’s?

I’m sure you have additional C’s that you use and follow in your developer program and outreach. Here are a few additional C’s that I hear being used in presentations at the recent Evans Data Developer Marketing Summit: coolness, cognition, context, curiosity, culture, cohesiveness, completeness, capture, closed, and campaign.

 

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David Intersimone “David I”
Vice President of Developer Communities
Evans Data Corporation
davidi@evansdata.com
Blog: https://www.devrelate.com/blog/
Skype: davidi99
Twitter: @davidi99
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidi99/

Webinar – September 28, 2017 – Ten Developer API Success Factors for your DevMktg and DevRel Program

Today more than 80% of developers belong to one or more developer programs. Sixty-two percent of developers, in a recent Evans Data Developer Program research survey, say they don’t use APIs that aren’t supported by a Developer Relations program. What motivates a developer to want to adopt a particular technology or tool?  What motivates them to recommend and/or buy a technology, tool, framework, etc.?

The answers to these questions are crucial to the success of API marketing efforts. In order to sell a product, companies must be able to first, reach developers, second, provide a clear and unique message that emphasizes the particular value and functionality of their tool or platform, and finally, convince developers that these offerings can benefit them and/or the company they work for.  Knowing what the primary influences are in the developer world is critical.

Evans Data reaches out to its global developer panel to produce two annual tactical marketing reports: Developer Marketing Survey Report and Developer Relations Survey Report. The Developer Marketing Survey contains software developers’ attitudes about marketing tools and programs used to promote and sell products to them. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer marketing campaigns. The Developer Relations Survey examines issues and elements of developer programs. This report provides invaluable insight for your developer program and advocacy.

There are many aspects related to a developer’s API adoption and a company’s decision to open their APIs to developers. These aspects can include: API features, Documentation, Developer Support, Reasons for joining and staying in a program, ROI and Developer Program Measurement, Developer Outreach, Training, Spurring Participation, Developer Resources, and App Stores.

In this DevRelate webinar, you’ll learn about the many aspects of successful API adoption, developer program features and developer marketing best practices that lead to a successful partnership between your company and developers.

Agenda

  1. Developer adoption motivations
  2. Developer recommendation/purchase motivations
  3. Aspects of successful API adoption
  4. API Features and Developer Marketing Best Practices
  5. Q&A

 

Dates/Times

Thursday, September 28, 2017

  • 7am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 9am CDT (Chicago) | 10am EDT (New York) | 2pm GMT | 3pm BST (London) | 4pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 10am PDT (Santa Cruz) | 12noon CDT (Chicago) | 1pm EDT (New York) | 5pm GMT | 6pm BST (London) | 7pm CEST (Frankfurt)
  • 1pm PDT (Santa Cruz) | 2pm CDT (Chicago) | 3pm EDT (New York)
  • 5pm PDT (Santa Cruz) | 8am CST (Beijing Friday, September 29) | 10am AEST (Sydney Friday, September 29)

 

Register Now to Reserve your Seat: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/6630659132606705922

Note: The webinar repeats on multiple days and times. Choose the date and time that fits your schedule.

 

Who Should Attend

  • Managers & Directors of Developer Programs
  • Technology & Developer Advocates
  • Business Development Managers & Directors
  • Product Marketing Managers & Directors
  • Marketing Managers
  • Product Managers
  • Research Managers
  • Corporate Communications Managers
  • Heads of Developer Marketing
  • ANYONE who deals with developers!

 

Register Now!

Note: The webinar repeats on multiple days and times. Choose the date and time that fits your schedule.

 

Presenter

David Intersimone “David I”, Vice President of Developer Communities, Evans Data Corporation

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